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REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

Note.—The regular meetings of the Regents are held at 2 p.m. on the second Tuesday of each month, except July, and on the day before Commencement, at 618 Crocker bldg., San Francisco.

REGENTS EX OFFICIO. His EXCELLENCY HIRAM WARREN JOHNSON..

Sacramento Governor and President of the Regents ex officio. His HONOR ALBERT J. WALLACE.

.Los Angeles Lieutenant-Governor. Hon. A. H. HEWITT..

.Yuba City Speaker of the Assembly. Hon. EDWARD HYATT.

Sacramento State Superintendent of Public Instruction.

..San Francisco Pacific Hardware and Steel Co.

President of the State Board of Agriculture. RUDOLPH JULIUS TaussiG, Esq.,

Main and Mission streets, San Francisco

President of the MechanicsInstitute. BENJ. IDE WHEELER, Ph.D., LL.D.,

President's House, University of California, Berkeley

President of the University.

A. L. SCOTT.

APPOINTED REGENTS. The term of the appointed Regents is sixteen years, and terms expire March 1 of the year indicated. The names are arranged in the order of original accession to the Board. ISAIAS WILLIAM HELLMAN, Esq......

1918 Wells, Fargo-Nevada National Bank, San Francisco. CHESTER ROWELL, M.D..

.1927 Fresno. JACOB BERT REINSTEIN, M.A...

.1912 836 Mills bldg., San Francisco.

.1916 ELIOT BUDD, A.B...

Stockton.

JOHN

1914

.1916

.1920

.1918

1922

.1912

Mrs. PHOEBE APPERSON HEARST

Pleasanton.
Business address: 354 Pine st., San Francisco.
ARTHUR WILLIAM FOSTER, Esq...

1210 James Flood bldg., San Francisco. GARRET WILLIAM MCENERNEY, Esq...

1277 James Flood bldg., San Francisco. GUY CHAFFEE EARL, A.B...

1005 Shreve bldg., San Francisco. JAMES WILFRED MCKINLEY, B.S..

Rooms 432-437 Pacific Electric bldg., Los Angeles. Rev. PETER CHRISTOPHER YORKE, S.T.D. 1267 Sixteenth av.,

Oakland. JOHN ALEXANDER BRITTON, Esq.

445 Sutter st., San Francisco. FREDERICK WILLIAM DOHRMANN, Esq..

201 Geary st., San Francisco. HON. THOMAS ROBERT BARD.

Hueneme. FRANK SPAULDING JOHNSON, Esq..

210 California st., San Francisco. WILLIAM HENRY CROCKER, Ph.B..

Crocker National Bank, San Francisco. TRUXTON BEALE, LL.B.

Pacific Union Club, San Francisco.

1914

.1920

.1922

.1924

.1924

.1927

OFFICERS OF THE REGENTS.

His EXCELLENCY HIRAM WARREN JOHNSON.

.President Sacramento. VICTOR HENDRICKS HENDERSON, B.L. ..Secretary and Land Agent

220 California Hall, Berkeley. ISAIAS WILLIAM HELLMAN, Jr., Ph.B...

Treasurer Union Trust Company, San Francisco. FLETCHER A. CUTLER, Esq.

..Counsel 506 Crocker bldg., San Francisco.

CALIFORNIA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY

Organized 1872.

OFFICERS.

President-GASTON E. Bacon.

Treasurer-RICHARD E. WHITE.

Secretary and Dean-FRANKLIN THEODORE GREEN.

Directors-G. TON E. Bacon, JOHN H, DAWSON, JAMES G. MUNSON, VAL SCHMIDT, ISAAC TOBRINER, RICHARD E. WHITE,

ROBERT ALEXANDER LEET.

FACULTY.

BENJAMIN IDE WHEELER, Ph.D., LL.D., President of the University

of California. WILLIAM THEODORE WENZELL, Ph.G., M.D., Phar.M., Emeritus Pro

fessor of Chemistry. FRANKLIN THEODORE GREEN, Ph.G., Professor of Chemistry, and

Director of the Chemical Laboratories, and Dean. FREDERICK WILLIAM NISH, Phar.B., Professor of Pharmacy, Director

of the Pharmaceutical Laboratory. ALBERT SCHNEIDER, M.D., Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacognosy, Eco

nomic Pharmaceutical Botany, Histology, and Bacteriology. HENRY BENJAMIN CAREY, B.S., M.D., Profes of Botany, Materia

Medica, and Physiology. HAYDN MOZART SIMMONS, Ph.G., M.D., Instructor in Materia Medica,

and Lecturer on Toxicology. HARLEY RUPERT WILEY, A.B., LL.B., Lecturer on Pharmacal Juris

prudence. ROBERT ALEXANDER LEET, Ph.G., VALENTINE SCHMIDT, Lecturers on

the Business Side of Pharmacy.

CALENDAR.

40th Annual Session.

1911.

August 10, Thursday-August 15, Tuesday.--Entrance examinations at Berkeley for students to matriculate for three years'

Permits to enter the examination room must be secured in advance from the Recorder of the Faculties at Berkeley.

course.

September 5, Tuesday.- Matriculation on credentials. Entrance

examinations for two years' course begin. September 7, Thursday.-Assignment of seats, desks, and lockers.

Apparatus given out.

September 9, Saturday.-Admission Day: a holiday.
November 1, Wednesday.-Subjects of theses to be submitted to

Dean.

November 23, Thursday. Thanksgiving Day: a holiday.
December 13, Wednesday.-('hristmas vacation begins.

1912.

January 2, Tuesday.--College work resumed.

February 13, Tuesday.--A holiday.

February 22, Thursday.- Washington's Birthday: a holiday.

March 7, Thursday.-Senior theses to be handed in.
March 23, Saturday.—Charter Day: a holiday in the University.
April 27, Saturday.-Last day of instruction.
April 29, Monday.--Final examinations begin.

May 15, Wednesday:-Commencement Day.

ANNOUNCEMENT FOR 1911-1912.

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The demand for educated pharmacists was never so great as is to-day. Not only are salaries higher than ever before for those employed as clerks, but there are more opportunities for advancement. The demand, however, is for good men, those having business capacity, industry, integrity, and a good pharmaceutical education. There is no likelihood that there will be any material change in this respect, unless it be to intensify the present demand for the kind of pharmacists now most needed. Employers are looking for men who have a college education, and the supply is not equal to the demand. Furthermore, the National and State Pure Food and Drug laws call for such constant care in the making of pharmaceuticals, such vigilance in the examination and testing of drugs and chemicals, that no drug store can be considered properly equipped that has not in it at least one person who is capable of applying the tests of the Pharmacopoeia. And these laws have come to stay. They may be-probably will be—modified, but they will never be repealed, because the people demand them. Pharmacists must adjust themselves to public sentiment, and the public expect pure drugs and medicines and competent persons to manufacture and dispense them.

The necessary knowledge of the sciences on which the art of pharmacy is based, and the technical skill required to practice that art, are best acquired—most economically learned-in a college of pharmacy. The time has gone by when any considerable amount of teaching is done in the drug store. Little, if any, didactic instruction is presented to the junior clerk, and not much technique is acquired. The demands of trade and the somewhat factory-like method of doing the technical work of the laboratory and prescription counter are alike ill adapted to the purpose of imparting instruction. In many drug stores but little manufacturing is done. In still more, practically no drug testing or assaying is thought of, and even where this is done, the facilities for doing it are usually limited, and the work is done by the proprietor or his chief clerk, no pains being taken to teach the juniors how to do it. Clerks are hired to do certain work whereby they can add to their employer's revenue, and they are paid in money, not in teaching. Usually the

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