The Spanish Conquest in America: And Its Relation to the History of Slavery and to the Government of Colonies, Količina 3

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Stran 40 - ... on all four of the sides from the base to the top. The front was the figure of a man, curiously and richly dressed, and the face, evidently a portrait, solemn, stern, and well fitted to excite terror. The...
Stran 235 - We might well wish, for many reasons, that this laudable work remained to us, but I am not aware of there being any traces of its existence. The good fathers then began to study how they should introduce their poem to the notice of the Indians of Tuzulutlan ; and, availing themselves of a happy thought for this purpose, they called to their aid four Indian merchants, who were in the habit of going with merchandise several times a year into this province called
Stran 40 - Continent of America were not savages. With an interest perhaps stronger than we had ever felt in wandering among the ruins of Egypt, we followed our guide, who, sometimes missing his way, with a constant...
Stran 333 - Our northern natures can hardly comprehend how the sun, and the moon, and the stars were imaged in the heart of a Peruvian, and dwelt there ; how the changes in these luminaries were combined with all his feelings and his fortunes ; how the dawn was hope to him ; how the fierce mid-day brightness was power to him ; how the declining sun was death to him ; and how the new morning was a resurrection to him : nay, more, how the sun, and the moon, and the stars were his personal friends, as well as his...
Stran 303 - Here I cannot forbear to commend the patient virtue of the Spaniards : we seldom or never find that any nation hath endured so many misadventures and miseries as the Spaniards have done, in their Indian discoveries ; yet persisting in their enterprises with an invincible constancy, they have annexed to their kingdom so many goodly provinces, as bury the remembrance of all dangers past.
Stran 40 - Egyptians ; one displaced from its pedestal by enormous roots ; another locked in the close embrace of branches of trees, and almost lifted out of the earth ; another hurled to the ground, and bound down by huge vines and creepers; and one standing, with its altar before it, in a grove of trees which grew around it, seemingly to shade and shroud it as a sacred thing ; in the solemn stillness of the woods, it seemed a divinity mourning over a fallen people.
Stran 20 - For if bishops and other prelates are sent, they will follow the custom practised by them for our sins at the present day, by disposing of the estates of the church, and expending them in pageants and other foolish matters, and bestowing rights of inheritance on their sons or relatives. A still greater evil would result from this state of things : the natives of this country formerly had their priests, who were engaged in conducting the rites and ceremonies of their religion ; and so strict were...
Stran 235 - Indeed, they took such pains in learning their lessons, and (with the fine sense for musical intonation which the Indians generally possessed) repeated these verses so well, that there was nothing left to desire. The composition and the teaching occupied three months, and was not completed until the middle of August, 1537. Las Casas communicated his...
Stran 343 - ... be absorbed; that the spirit of God pervades the universe, always immediately present to his work, and consequently always in substance; that He alone is perfect benevolence, perfect truth, perfect beauty; that the love of Him alone is real and genuine love, while that of all other objects is absurd and illusory ; that the beauties of nature are faint resemblances — like images in a mirror — of the divine charms...
Stran 343 - Him alone is real and genuine love, while that of all other objects is absurd and illusory ; that the beauties of nature are faint resemblances, like images in a mirror, of the Divine charms ; that, from eternity without beginning to eternity without end, the Supreme Benevolence is occupied in bestowing happiness, or the means of attaining it ; that men can only attain it by performing their part of the primal covenant between them and the Creator ; that nothing has a pure, absolute existence but...

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