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A D V ER TI SE M E N T

TO THE FORMER EDITIONS.

TH

HE intent of the following Volumes

poetical performances, which seemed to merit a longer remembrance than what would probably be secured to them by the MANNER wherein they were originally published. This design was first suggested to the Editor, as it was afterwards conducted, by the opinions of fome Gentlemen, whose names it would do him the highest honour to mention. He desires in this place also to make his acknowledgments to the Authors of several pieces inserted in these Volumes, which were never before in print; and which, he is persuaded, would be thought to add credit to the most judicious collection of this kind in our lanVOL. I.

A

guage.

guage. He hath nothing farther to premise, but that the Reader must not expect to be pleased with every particular poém which is here presented to him. It is impossible to furnish out an entertainment of this nature, where every part shall be relished by every guest: it will be sufficient, if nothing is set before him, but what has been approved by those of the most acknowledged taste,

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ON THE
PROSPECT OF PEACE,

,
Α Ρ Ο Ε M.
By THOMAS TICKELL, Esq; 2

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To the LORD PRIVY-S E AL, 6

Sacerdos Fronde super MITRAM, et fælici comptus oliva.

VIRG.

Contending kings, and fields of death, too long

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Have been
Who hath not read of fam'd Ramilia's plain,
Bavaria's fall, and Danube choak'd with slain?

Exhausled * Mr. Tickell was born in the year 1686, at Bridekirk in Cumberland, where his father, a clergyman, then lived. He became a member of Queen's College, Oxford, in April 1701. On the 22d of February,

1ο8, 1708, he took the degree of M. A. and two years afterwards was Chosen Fellow.of his College. During his refidence at the University, the Opera of Rosamond' was performed, and on its appearance,

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Exhausted themes! A gentler note I raise,
And fing returning Peace in fofter lays.
Their ury quell'd, and martial rage allay'd,
I wait our heroes in the sylvan fhade.
Disbanding hosts are imag'd to my mind,
And warring pow'rs in friendly leagues combin'd;

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Mr. Tickell addressed a Poem to Mr. Addison, the Author, which was so well received, that it said the foundation of an intimacy between the two friends, and proved of the greatest advantage to Mr. Tickell's future fortune. When Mr. Addison went to Ireland as Secretary to Lord Sunderland, Mr. Tickell accompanied him, and was employed in public business. In 1717, he became Under Secretary of State, and about 1725, was appointed Secretary to the Lords Juftices of Ireland, a place of great honour, in the enjoyment whereof he continued until his death, which happened at Bath, on the 23d of April 1740.

6 This was Dr. John Robinson, then Bishop of Bristol, but afterwards of London. He was born near Richmond in Yorkshire, and resided fome years at Oriel College, Oxford, where he took the degree of M.A. March 5, 7683, and of D. D. by diploma, 7th of August 1710. He had lived many years in Sweden, first as Chaplain to the Ambassador, and afterwards in the quality of Ambassador himself. In both these stations he conducted himself with great credit and advantage. to the government. On his return home, he was preferred to a Prebend at Canterbury, then to the Deanry of Windsor, and afterwards to the Bishoprick of Bristol. In 1711, the custody of the Privy Seal was given to him, and he was nominated one of the Plenipotentiaries to negotiate the treaty of Utrecht. On the 13th March, 1713, he was translated to the See of London, and died IIth of April 1723.

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