Speech of Mr. Van Buren, of New York, Delivered in the Senate of the United States, on the Mission to Panama, March, 1826, Količina 43 ,6. izdaja

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Gales & Seaton, 1826 - 41 strani
 

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Stran 32 - I could wish that they will control the usual current of the passions or prevent our nation from running the course which has hitherto marked the destiny of nations. But if I may even flatter myself that they may be productive of some partial benefit, some occasional good, that they may now and then recur to moderate the fury of party spirit, to warn against the mischiefs of foreign intrigue, to guard against the impostures of pretended patriotism — this hope will be a full recompense for the solicitude...
Stran 14 - ... their independence, and maintained it, and whose independence we have, on great consideration and on just principles, acknowledged, we could not view any interposition for the purpose of oppressing them, or controlling in any other manner their destiny, by any European power, in any other light than as the manifestation of an unfriendly disposition towards the United States.
Stran 35 - The great rule of conduct for us in regard to foreign nations is, in extending our commercial relations to have with them as little political connection as possible. So far as we have already formed engagements let them be fulfilled with perfect good faith. Here let us stop.
Stran 32 - Although it is very true, that we ought not to involve ourselves in the political system of Europe, but to keep ourselves always distinct and separate from it if we can, yet to effect this separation, early, punctual, and continual information of the current chain of events, and of the political projects in contemplation, is no less necessary than if we were directly concerned in them. It is necessary in order to the...
Stran 15 - This is a matter of immediate utility to the American states that are at war with Spain, and is in accordance with the repeated declarations and protests of the Cabinet at Washington.
Stran 29 - I knew it to be a principle in our public policy, which had for its support all that is instructive in experience, all that is venerable in authority. That authority is no less than the parting admonitions of the Father of his Country. The earnest, eloquent, and impressive appeals upon this subject, contained in his Farewell Address, are yet, and will, I trust, long remain, fresh in our recollections; nor were the sentiments he thus avowed mere speculative opinions, founded upon an abstract consideration...
Stran 27 - Southern Nations are, even yet, so far under the dominion of prejudice, that they have incorporated with their Political Constitutions, an exclusive Church, without toleration of any other than the dominant Sect. The abandonment of this last badge of religious bigotry and oppression may be pressed more effectually, by the united exertions of those who concur in the principles of freedom of conscience, upon those who are yet to be convinced of their justice and wisdom, than by the solitary efforts...
Stran 16 - To these observations I replied, that against the power of Spain they had given sufficient proof that they required no assistance, and the United States had pledged themselves not to permit any other Power to interfere either with their independence or form of government; and that, as in the event of such an attempt being made by the Powers of Europe, we would be compelled to take the most active and efficient part and to bear the brunt of the contest...
Stran 24 - We cannot allow a transfer of the island to any European power. But if Spain should refuse to conclude a peace, and obstinately resolve on continuing the war, although we do not desire that either Colombia or Mexico should acquire the island of Cuba, the president cannot see any justifiable ground on which we can forcibly interfere.
Stran 24 - ... in a desolating manner ; if, contrary to all expectation, they should put arms into the hands of one race of the inhabitants to destroy the lives of another ; if, in short, they should countenance and encourage excesses and examples, the contagion of which, from our neighborhood, would be dangerous to our quiet and safety ; the government of the United States might feel itself called upon to interpose its power.

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