HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES

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eral orders 80 Fort Washington on the Hudson 81 Defences of
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Heroic conduct of Stirling and his party 93 Stirling sur
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Measures for a retreat 101 A council of war 102 Skilful
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retreat successful 105 Erroneous account of the retreat 105
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The city of New York must be abandoned 110 Sullivans recep
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York must be evacuated 114 His plea to congress 114 He explains
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Washingtons conduct on the day 122 Character of Gordon as an his
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Strength of the American position 128 Declaration of the Howes
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American privateers 134 Army regulations adopted 135 Condition
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The declaration of independence unites England 141 Speech of Car
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Fox applauded by Gibbon and Burke 144 Unsat
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Mercilessness of Germain 152 Carletons plan of cam
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Lees character as a commander 168 His insincerity 169
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Confidence of John Adams 173 British ships ascend the Hudson
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Greenes elation 180 He finds fault with Washington 180 Howe
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WASHINGTONS RETREAT THROUGH THE JERSEYS November 17
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Putnam crosses into the Jerseys 186 Instructions to Lee 186 Wash
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Cornwallis in New Jersey 194 Greenes neglect of orders
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Maryland willing to give up independence 199
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enters New Jersey 207 Sneers at Washington 207 His falsehood
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Opinions of Samuel Adams 214 Orders of Putnam 214 The Quak
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Secures all the boats 219 Proposes reform in the army 219
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Washingtons watchword 224 Washingtons plan of attack 224
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ton entered on both sides 233 Conduct of Rall 233 Ralls mistakes
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Measures adopted 238 Washington not appointed dictator 238
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Washington at Princeton 247 Battle of Princeton 248 Mercer
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The morning at Trenton 250 Washington turns towards
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Washington
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Sovereignty of the people 258 Confidence of the Amer
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Mode of electing the governor 267 Property qualification
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Finances of the United States 323 Finances of Eng
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Their reply 332 Demand for reënforcements 332 Reply
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of congress 338 Interference in Philadelphia 338 Clinton on
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CHAPTER XX
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Arnold 347 Retreat of the British 347 They reëmbark 348Con
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He defends himself 353 Howe returns to Bruns
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Vermont declares independence 360 Its independence opposed by con
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CHAPTER XXII
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The British at Fort Ann 370 A thanksgiving 370 Carleton
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to the council of New York 375 Schuyler despondent 375 Expects
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Honors to Herkimer 381 Character of the Indian allies 381
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marches through Philadelphia 393 Encamps beyond Wilmington
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Negro slaves side with the British 401 Washington
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tice Jay 406 Gates at Stillwater 406 His strength 407 His char
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Kingston burned down 414 Perplexity of Burgoyne 414 Gates
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Loss of the American frigate 423 Billingsport deserted
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talions with Cornwallis 428 Washington retreats 428 Why victory
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CHAPTER XXVI
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Congress has no power to levy taxes 441 Postoffice 441 Import
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of the esteem for Washington 444 Thirteen armies and not one
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tion a contradiction 450 Elements of union 450 Nationality
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Lovell on Washington 457 Discontent of congress
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Incompetency of Gates 463 Washington suffers exquisite pain
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His enemies shrink back 464 Gates 464 Mifflin 464Con
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gress for separatism 470 Washington for union 470 Congress jealous
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advice of George 478 His penitence in his old age 478 Burgoynes
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Franklins reply 485 France avows her treaties with
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mond rejoins 495 Chatham struck with death 495 Indifference
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THE UNITED STATES AND FRANCE 1778
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Why it had a spirit of revenge 502 Causes that con
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Stran 464 - SIR: — I find myself just able to hold the pen during a few minutes, and take this opportunity of expressing my sincere grief for having done, written, or said anything disagreeable to your Excellency. My career will soon be over, therefore justice and truth prompt me to declare my last sentiments. You are in my eyes the great and good man. May you long enjoy the love, veneration, and esteem of these States, whose liberties you have asserted by your virtues.
Stran 477 - If I were an American as I am an Englishman, while a foreign troop was landed in my country, I never would lay down my arms — never, never, never!
Stran 460 - I can assure those gentlemen, that it is a much easier and less distressing thing to draw remonstrances in a comfortable room by a good fireside, than to occupy a cold, bleak hill, and sleep under frost and snow, without clothes or blankets. However, although they seem to have little feeling for the naked and distressed soldiers, I feel superabundantly for them, and, from my soul, I pity those miseries, which it is neither in my power to relieve or prevent.
Stran 352 - that the flag of the thirteen United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field, representing a new constellation.
Stran 477 - You may swell every expense, and every effort, still more extravagantly ; pile and accumulate every assistance you can buy or borrow ; traffic and barter with every little pitiful German prince that sells and sends his subjects to the shambles...
Stran 145 - Cavendish, on the sixth, moved that the house should resolve itself into a committee to consider of that revisal.
Stran 221 - It is needless to add that short enlistments and a mistaken dependence upon militia have been the origin of all our misfortunes, and the great accumulation of our debt. We find, sir, that the enemy are daily gathering strength from the disaffected. This strength, like a snow-ball by rolling will increase, unless some means can be devised to check effectually the progress of the enemy's arms. Militia may possibly do it for a little...
Stran 492 - He remarked to those in Paris who learned of him the secret of statesmanship: "He who shall introduce into public affairs the principles of primitive Christianity will change the face of the world...
Stran 479 - The battle had its effect also in France. The Count De Vergennes observed to the American commissioners in Paris on their first interview that nothing struck him so much as General Washington's attacking and giving battle to General Howe's army; that to bring an army raised within a year to this pass promised everything. The effect on the army itself may be judged from letters written at the time by officers to their friends. "Though we gave away a complete victory...
Stran 461 - Beside spreading disaffection, jealousy and fear among the people, they never fail, even in the most veteran troops, under the most rigid and exact discipline, to raise in the soldiery a disposition to licentiousness, to plunder and robbery, difficult to suppress afterward, and which has proved not only ruinous to the inhabitants, but in many instances to armies themselves.

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