Daniel De Foe's Voyage Round the World: By a Course Never Sailed Before. To which is Prefixed the Life of the Author, by William Shiells, Esq. In Three Volumes. ...

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Stran 7 - The original Power of the Collective Body of the People of England examined and asserted...
Stran 4 - Wherever God erects a house of prayer, The Devil always builds a chapel there: And 'twill be found upon examination, The latter has the largest congregation.
Stran 22 - ... which strongly inculcate the worship of God, the relative duties of husbands, wives, parents, and children, not in a dry dogmatic manner, but in a kind of dramatic way, which excites curiosity, keeps the attention awake, and is extremely interesting, and pathetic. We have already seen, that in his political capacity he was a declared enemy to popery, and a bold defender of revolution principles. He was held in much esteem by many great men, and though he never enjoyed any regular post under the...
Stran 14 - Pillory seems most to require it. The Reader is desired to observe that this Poem was the Author's Declaration, even when in the cruel hands of a merciless as well as unjust Ministry, that the treatment he had from them, was unjust, exorbitant, and consequently Illegal.
Stran 6 - Poetry was far from being the talent of De Foe. He wrote with more perspicuity and strength in prose ; and he seems to have understood as well as any man the civil constitution of the kingdom, which indeed was his chief study...
Stran 16 - In the preface he complains of the severe usage he had met with, but, says he, 'that the world may discern that I am not one of those who practice what they reprove, I began this satire with owning in myself those sins and misfortunes which I am no more exempted from, than other men; and as I am far from pretending to be free from human frailties, but forwarder to confess any of the errors of my life, than any man can be to accuse me; I think myself in a better way to reformation, than those who...
Stran 5 - COULD but our ancestors retrieve their fate, And see their offspring thus degenerate ; How we contend for birth and names unknown, And build on their past actions, not our own ; They'd cancel records, and their tombs deface, And openly disown the vile degenerate race : For fame of families is all a cheat, It's personal virtue only makes us great.
Stran 24 - Considered as a poet, Daniel De Foe is not so eminent, as in a political light: he has taken no pains in versification; his ideas are masculine, his expressions coarse, and his numbers generally rough. He seems rather to have studied to speak truth, by probing wounds to the bottom, than, by embellishing his versification, to give it a more elegant keenness. This, however, seems to have proceeded more...
Stran 13 - Mr. De Foe, who possessed a resolute temper, and a most confirmed fortitude of mind, was never awed by the threats of power, nor deterred from speaking truth by the insolence of the great.
Stran 25 - Englishman, lines 893-912.] What provocation De Foe had given to Pope we cannot determine, but he has not escaped the lash of that gentleman's pen. Mr. Pope in his second book of his Dunciad thus speaks of him;1 Earless on high stood unabash'd De Foe, And Tutchin flagrant from the scourge below. It may be remarked that he has joined him with Tutchin, a man whom judge Jeffries had ordered to be so inhumanly...

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