Life: A Book for a Quiet Hour ...

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Stevens & Haynes, 1868 - 264 strani
 

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Stran 67 - Every one that flatters thee Is no friend in misery. Words are easy, like the wind ; Faithful friends are hard to find : Every man will be thy friend Whilst thou hast wherewith to spend ; But if store of crowns be scant, No man will supply thy want. If that one be prodigal, Bountiful they will him call, And with such-like flattering,
Stran 26 - Men shall dream dreams," inferreth, that young men are admitted nearer to God than old, because vision is a clearer revelation than a dream. And certainly the more a man drinketh of the world, the more it intoxicateth ; and Age doth profit rather in the powers of understanding, than in the virtues of the will and affections.
Stran 158 - If ye endure chastening, God dealeth with you as with sons ; for what son is he whom the Father chasteneth not ? But if ye be without chastisement, whereof all are partakers, then are ye bastards and not sons.
Stran 103 - And yet God deliver us from pinching poverty ; and grant that, having a competency, we may be content and thankful. Let us not repine, or so much as think the gifts of God unequally dealt, if we see another abound with riches ; when, as God knows, the cares that are the keys that keep those riches, hang often so heavily at the rich man's girdle, that they clog him with weary days and restless nights, even when others sleep quietly.
Stran 62 - The friends thou hast, and their adoption tried, Grapple them to thy soul with hoops of steel, But do not dull thy palm with entertainment Of each new-hatch'd, unfledged comrade.
Stran 242 - I shall be well enough presently, if you will only let me sit where you are, and take my chair ; for there is a confounded hand in sight of me here, which has often bothered me before, and now it won't let me fill my glass with a good will.
Stran 201 - For books are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are ; nay, they do preserve as in a vial the purest efficacy and extraction of that living intellect that bred them.
Stran 234 - Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested; that is, some books are to be read only in parts; others to be read but not curiously, and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention.
Stran 159 - In the poorest cottage are Books ; is one BOOK, wherein for several thousands of years the spirit of man has found light, and nourishment, and an interpreting response to whatever is Deepest in him...
Stran 109 - ... twas a taught trick to gain credit of the world for more sense and knowledge than a man was worth; and that, with all its pretensions, - it was no better, but often worse, than what a French wit had long ago defined it, - viz.

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