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129. Ice Cream Making.

Mr. BAIRD.

Instruction and practice in making plain and fancy ice cream, ices, and sherbets.

4 hrs., second half-year; 2 units. F, 8; F, 1-4. Prerequisite: course 116 or 132; course 116 may be taken concurrently.

130. Market Milk.

Mr. DOUGLASS. Conditions affecting quality of milk for direct consumption; requisites for producing different grades of milk; tests for quality, adulteration, etc,; pasteurizing, standardizing, and bottling milk for distribution; inspecting dairies and milk plants.

5 hrs., second half-year; 3 units. W F, 10; F, 1-4. Prerequisite: course 116 or 132; course 116 may be taken concurrently.

(Given at Berkeley)

*132. Dairy Fundamentals. Assistant Professor DAVIS. Study of the secretion, nature, and composition of milk and milk products; various tests used in testing dairy products; care and handling of milk and cream, and regulations covering the same; dairy inspection; a survey of the dairy industry and a study of California dairy conditions. Students who have credit for Dairy Industry 116 will receive but 1 unit credit.

5 hrs., first half-year; 3 units. Lectures, F, 1; S, 8; laboratory, F, 2–5.

ENTOMOLOGY

1. General Entomology.

Assistant Professor VAN DYKE.

A general review of the structure, habits, and classification of insects. 2 hrs., either half-year. Tu Th, 10. Course 3, 4 or 5 must be taken concurrently with this course.

2. Economic Entomology.

Professor WOODWORTH.

Detailed studies of a series of the most injurious insects.

2 hrs., either half-year. Tu Th, 11. Course 3 or 4 must be taken concurrently with this course.

3. Supplementary Course.

Recitations based on a text.

The STAFF.

1 hr., either half-year. As many sections will be organized as necessary. Each section limited to fifteen students. Hours will be announced at the beginning of the term. No taken concurrently with another course.

* Not to be given, 1915-16.

credit except when

4. Elementary Systematic Entomology. Assistant Professor VAN DYKE. The structure and classification of insects. Laboratory studies supplemented by field work.

6 hrs., laboratory and 3 hrs. field work; either half-year; 3 units. Tu Th, 1-4.

5. General Entomological Laboratory.

Mr. ESSIG. Laboratory methods in the preparation of insects and animal parasites for microscopical study; observations of living specimens; rearing and general methods in the study.

6 hrs., either half-year; 2 units. M W, 2-5.

6. Parasites.

Associate Professor HERMS.

Classification, biology, relation to disease, principles of control as applied to the commoner parasites of man and beast.

Lectures and recitations.

3 hrs., first half-year. Tu Th, 10; a section meeting to be arranged.

9. Field Practice. Mr. VAN DUZEE. Practice in the recognition of the commoner insects, observations of their habits and the methods of collecting and mounting them. 6 hrs., either half-year; 2 units. M F, 1-4.

23. Apiculture.

Mr. COLEMAN. Lectures covering in outline the whole field of apiculture, with special emphasis on the natural history of the honey bee. Apiary practice involving the technique of handling bees and the more common manipulations.

8 hrs., second half-year; 4 units. Lectures, M F, 1; apiary work, M F, 2-5.

27. Ecology.

Associate Professor HERMS.

A discussion of the relation of animals to their environment, including a discussion of such topics as hunger and food, behavior, growth, adaptation and variation, social habits, insects and plants, aquatic habits, etc.

3 hrs., second half-year. M W F, 10.

99. Practice in Entomology.

Assistant Professor VAN DYKE and other members of the staff. Field study of forest insects; practice in making reports on field investigations, records in breeding-cage work, description of insects, and the collecting and mounting of specimens. The camp will be located in 1915 at the southern end of Fallen Leaf Lake. There will be free camping ground, cottages and hotel accommodations. Students should arrange with Dr. Van Dyke as early as possible for this work.

In 1916 the course will be in charge of Professor Herms, and will relate to insects affecting man and domestic animals.

6 units.

100. Entomological Teaching.

Professor WOODWORTH.

A discussion of the objects and methods in entomological teaching with detailed study of examination questions used in American universities.

7 hrs., first half-year; 3 units. Lectures, W, 4; laboratory hours to be arranged.

101. Insect Problems.

Professor WOODWORTH. Illustrated lectures on the current literature of entomology, with a critical discussion of the methods of study and of entomological theories. Open to the public.

2 hrs., either half-year. Tu, 7–9 p.m. Supplementary course. Credit allowed only when taken in conjunction with another course in entomology.

102. Entomology.

Associate Professor HERMS. Anatomy (external and internal), physiology, habits and classification of insects and arachnids. Lectures, laboratory exercises and field work. Designed for students who have previously had no entomology.

5 hrs., first half-year; 3 units. Lectures, Tu Th, 9; laboratory, Tu, 2-5.

103. Special Problems.

Professor WOODWORTH and Assistant Professor VAN DYKE. Individual instruction in special problems in entomology.

6-12 hrs., either half-year; 2-4 units. M Tu W Th F, 2-5 or by arrangement.

104. Entomology. Professor WOODWORTH and Mr. ESSIG. A comprehensive review of the structure, habits and classification of insects and their economic relationship, constituting a general introductory course for advanced students.

8 hrs., either half-year; 4 units. Lectures, Tu Th, 1; laboratory, Tu Th, 2-5. Not open to those who have taken courses 1, 2, 4 or 5. Prerequisite: Zoology la.

112. Advanced Systematic Entomology. Assistant Professor VAN DYKE. Advanced study of the classification of insects.

9 hrs., either half-year; 3 units. M W F, 1-4, or by arrangement. Prerequisite: course 4.

113. Homopterous Insects.

Mr. COLEMAN.

A general study of the aphids, white flies, scale insects, and other homoptera, including methods of collecting, preserving, and study of their life history.

7 hrs., either half-year; 3 units. Lecture, Tu, 8; laboratory, Tu Th, 2–5.

114. Forest Insects.

Assistant Professor VAN DYKE.

The study of insects in their relationship to forests and woodlands. 2 hrs. lecture, and 3 hrs. field work, either half-year. Tu Th, Prerequisite: course 4.

115. Homopterous Insects and their Parasites.

Mr. COLEMAN.

4.

An advanced study of the classification of the aphids, white flies, scale insects, and other homoptera, their life histories, and parasites. The student will be given individual instruction in the selection and working out of a problem as a thesis for graduation, and of original articles for publication.

3 or more units, either half-year. Hours to be arranged. Prerequisite: course 113.

116. Veterinary Parasitology.

Associate Professor HERMS and Mr. FREEBORN. The relation of animal parasites and disease carriers to domesticated animals, with special emphasis placed on control. Especially designed for students in veterinary science and animal industry. This course satisfies in full the requirements in parasitology in Class A veterinary colleges.

8 hrs., first half-year; 4 units. Lectures, M W, 10; laboratory, M W, 1-4.

117. Insecticide and Fungicide Preparation.

Mr. MILLER. Laboratory practice in the preparation of the insecticides and fungicides which may be prepared on the farm; demonstrations of simple tests. Given only in conjunction with course 118 or other allied

course.

3 hrs., either half-year; 1 unit. W, 2-5.

118. Insecticides and Fungicides.

Mr. GRAY.

A discussion of the chemistry and composition of remedies used for the control of parasites that infest vegetation and animals, including the source of raw materials, commercial, and home manufactures. Lectures and recitations.

3 hrs., first half-year. M W F, 8.

119. Insecticide and Fungicide Analysis.

Mr. GRAY and Mr. MILLER.

Laboratory practice in the microscopical and chemical methods of examination of insecticides and fungicides. Given only in conjunction with or following course 118.

3 hrs., either half-year; 1 unit. Two sections: Tu Th, 2-5. Prerequisite: Agricultural Chemistry 1 or 2, Chemistry 5 or 6A-6B.

120. Inspection Laws.

Professor WOODWORTH and Mr. GRAY.

A study of the laws and decisions relative to horticultural quarantine, inspection and insecticide control work; the organization of insecticide control work; inspection; official methods of analysis, and a review of the commercial insecticides.

3 hrs., second half-year. Tu Th S, 8.

121. Life History Work.

Assistant Professor VAN DYKE.

Method and practice in working out the life histories of insects in insectary and field.

6-9 hrs., either half-year; 2-3 units. Tu W Th, 1-4. Prerequisite: course 1, 2 or 4.

122. Citrus Fruit Insects.

Mr. COLEMAN.

A study of the scales and other insects affecting trees; methods of control.

7 hrs., first half-year; 3 units. Lectures, M, 1; laboratory, M F, Prerequisite: course 1 or 2.

123. Investigation of a Problem in Apiculture.

2-5.

Mr. NICKELS. University Farm. 3 units, second half-year. Hours to be arranged.

126. Medical Parasitology

Associate Professor HERMS. The role of animal parasites in the transmission and causation of human diseases. Special emphasis is placed on habits and control. For students in public health, medicine, sanitary science, and domestic science.

3 hrs., second half-year. Tu Th, 10; W, 4. Prerequisite: Zoology 1A, 1B, and Bacteriology 1.

127. Medical Parasitology Laboratory.

Associate Professor HERMS and Mr. FREEBORN.

Laboratory exercises involving the study of animal parasites of the human. Open to students taking or having had course 126 or equivalent.

6 hrs., second half-year; 2 units. M, W or F, 1-4.

128. Household Insects.

Mr. ESSIG.

The principal insects found in dwellings, particularly those attacking clothing, food, and persons. Laboratory and practical work.

5 hrs., second half-year; 3 units. Tu Th, 1. Laboratory hours to be arranged.

129A-129B. Undergraduate Thesis Course.

Associate Professor HERMS.

The investigation of a special problem in parasitology, with a typewritten report on the results.

2 to 5 units, throughout the year. Hours to be arranged.

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