The London encyclopaedia, or, Universal dictionary of science, art, literature, and practical mechanics, by the orig. ed. of the Encyclopaedia metropolitana [T. Curtis]., 45. del;1945. del

Sprednja platnica
Thomas Curtis (of Grove house sch, Islington)
 

Mnenja - Napišite recenzijo

Na običajnih mestih nismo našli nobenih recenzij.

Vsebina

Del 1
809
Del 2
825
Del 3
827
Del 4
829
Del 5
831
Del 6
843
Del 7
857
Del 8
859
Del 20
917
Del 21
919
Del 22
928
Del 23
935
Del 24
944
Del 25
945
Del 26
952
Del 27
955

Druge izdaje - Prikaži vse

Pogosti izrazi in povedi

Priljubljeni odlomki

Stran 799 - Britain; and that the King's Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords spiritual and temporal and Commons of Great Britain in Parliament assembled, had, hath and of right ought to have, full power and authority to make laws and statutes of sufficient force and validity to bind the colonies and people of America, subjects of the Crown of Great Britain in all cases whatsoever.
Stran 798 - That being then one plant which has such an organization of parts in one coherent body partaking of one common life, it continues to be the same plant as long as it partakes of the same life, though that life be communicated to new particles of matter vitally united to the living plant, in a like continued organization conformable to that sort of plants.
Stran 799 - But in conquered or ceded countries, that have already laws of their own, the king may indeed alter and change those laws; but, till he does actually change them, the ancient laws of the country remain, unless such as are against the law of God, as in the case of an infidel country.
Stran 799 - The form of government in most of them is borrowed from that of England. They have a governor named by the king, (or, in some proprietary colonies, by the proprietor), who is his representative or deputy. They have courts of justice of their own, from whose decisions an appeal lies to the king in council here in England.
Stran 799 - Plantations or colonies, in distant countries, are either such where the lands are claimed by right of occupancy only, — by finding them desert and uncultivated, and peopling them from the mother country ; or where, when already cultivated, they have been either gained by conquest, or ceded to us by treaties.
Stran 799 - Our American plantations are principally of this latter sort, being obtained in the last century either by right of conquest and driving out the natives (with what natural justice I shall not at present inquire), or by treaties. And therefore the common law of England, as such, has no allowance or authority there; they being no part of the mother country, but distinct, though dependent dominions.
Stran 791 - Nor fear'd the chief th' unequal fight to try, Who sought no more than on his foe to die. But this bold lord, with manly strength...
Stran 799 - The delegates of the United Colonies of New Hampshire, Massachusetts Bay, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, the counties of New Castle, Kent, and Sussex, on Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina: To GEORGE WASHINGTON, ESQ.
Stran 725 - ... to the solution. Filter the fluid, and precipitate the zirconia and iron by pure ammonia ; wash the precipitates well, and then treat the hydrates with oxalic acid, boiling them well together, that the acid may act on the iron, retaining it in solution whilst an insoluble oxalate of zirconia is formed. It is then to be filtered, and the oxalate washed, until no iron can be detected in the water that passes. The earthy oxalate is when dry of an opaline colour ; after being well washed, it is to...
Stran 805 - Yet man, vain man, would with his short-lined plummet Fathom the vast abyss of heavenly justice. Whatever is, is in its causes just, Since all things are by fate. But purblind man Sees but a part o' th' chain, the nearest links, His eyes not carrying to that equal beam That poises all above.

Bibliografski podatki