Paterson's national benefit: a treatise on how to propagate and cultivate potatoes

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Stran 5 - It has been said that the man who makes two blades of grass grow where only one grew before...
Stran 53 - In short, the way to wealth, if you desire it, is as plain as the way to market. It depends chiefly on two words, industry and frugality; that is, waste neither time nor money, but make the best use of both.
Stran 52 - There have been many suggestions made as to the prevention of sea- sickness, none of which have, to say the least, been found in practice to be completely successful. The introduction into practice of hydrate of chloral, which produces with certainty sleep for a definite number of hours, has suggested a means of escaping the horrors of a short sea- passage at least, and possibly of mitigating the most prolonged horrors of sea-sickness. To go asleep at Dover, and to wake to find one's self at Calais,...
Stran 60 - In warm weather, meat should be examined when it comes in ; and if flies have touched it, the part must be cut off, and then well washed. In the height of summer, it is a very safe way to let meat that is to be salted lie an hour in very cold water, rubbing well any part likely to have been fly-blown ; then wipe it quite dry, and have salt ready, and rub it thoroughly in every part, throwing a handful over it besides. Turn it every day, and rub the pickle in, which will make it ready for the table...
Stran 61 - ... dressing from currents of air, and the meat is not frosted, you cannot do better than follow the old general rule of allowing rather more than a quarter of an hour to the pound ; a little more or less, according to the temperature of the weather, in proportion as the piece is thick or thin, the strength of the fire, the nearness of the meat to it, and the frequency with which you baste it; the more it is basted the less time it will take, as it keeps the meat soft and mellow on the outside, and...
Stran 61 - The best way to keep what is to -be eaten unsalted is, as before directed, to 'examine it well, wipe it every day, and put some pieces of charcoal over it. If meat is brought from a distance in warm weather, the butcher should be ordered to cover it close, and bring it early in the morning ; but even then, if it is...
Stran 56 - A silk handkerchief, worsted stocking, or other flannel substance wetted and drawn over the face, permits free breathing, and excludes, to a great extent, the smoke from the lungs. A wet sponge is alike efficacious.
Stran 60 - Round of beef, fillet of veal, and leg of mutton, are joints that bear a higher price; but as they have more solid meat, they deserve the preference. It is worth notice, however, that those joints which are inferior may be dressed as palatably : and being cheaper, they ought to be bought in turn ; for, when they are weighed with the prime pieces, it makes the price of these come lower.
Stran 51 - Newspapers must be posted either without a cover or in a cover open at both ends, and in such a manner as to admit of easy removal for examination ; if this rule be infringed, the newspaper or packet will be treated as a letter.
Stran 52 - Dover, and to wake to find oneself at Calais, is a plan which, failing other expedients, has in it much promise. An ordinary dose of hydrate of chloral produces sleep usually in a quarter of an hour, and with almost unfailing certainty. Some cases just published by Dr. Doring, of Vienna, seem to show that the value of hydrate of chloral to obviate seasickness is very great. It produces quiet and prolonged sleep. In all the instances recorded, it seems to have been of great value even during prolonged...

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