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ferruginous sandstone, often so rich in iron that the luster of that metal is developed under the chisel ; yet, smelting of this ore does not come under the range of economical probabilities, in consequence of the large amount of silica it contains. They are sometimes more argillaceous and composed of large rectangular blocks, with smooth planes and well-defined edges. Such as are close and fine grained would dress well and would equal the brown-stone fronts of Fifth avenue in the city of New York. Some of these rocks are nearly identical with the material of which the Smithsonian Institution is built.

I can give these rocks none other but a local position. They seem to be "carpet-baggers,” outliers (?). They are, however, often in considerable force and extent. Messrs. Meek and Hayden designate them in their section as No. 1, or lower cretaceous. Professor Haar, a noted German fossil botanist, refers them, from their organic remains, to the tertiary. If the object of this communication was not wholly practical and economical, I think I could produce some good arguments in favor of the latter reference. I will at all events state that these formations often jut down from the west into and partially fill valleys in the same manner as we find the tertiary sediment of the age of the White River basin, only they come further east. In this condition I found these ferruginous sandstones, with their characteristic impressions of leaves, in the valley of Salt Creek, near the salines in Nebraska, while examining the salt basin, under the direction of your office here. There they overlie carboniferous formations at or near the junction of the coal measures and the permian strata.

These rocks have probably been confounded with trias sandstone and another formation at the base of the cretaceous of like lithological appearance. But enough of science.

Among the cretaceous formations extending from Fort Harker mostly to the west boundary of the State, are also found good building stone, and sometimes even elegant. There are many of the strata that resemble the magnesian limestone of the permian, and are quite abundant north of the Arkansas River.

I made a hasty classification of these formations while running the first guide meridian west and five parallels, as you may observe in my report under my contract to your office here.

In concluding this branch of the subject, I hazard nothing in stating that there are but few sections of the Union of the extent of the State of Kansas that are so abundantly supplied with good and elegant building material.

My classification of soils, under the different contracts executed by me under the direction of your office here, was made with care, and is reliable so far as the matter could be determined by the existence of different species of plants, and often by test with a field case.

A word in explanation of the climate of Kansas. Our hottest summers are not correspondingly oppressive. In the past season the thermal range was unusually high. During the month of July, there were here 17 consecutive days in which the mercury marked from 940 to 100°, with an average of these high ranges of 960. However high the temperature of the day might have been, before nine o'clock in the evening the mercury would fall back to 75o. These oscillations produced a mean diurnal range of the month of 21°. These great thermal ranges are the results of a dry atmosphere, clear and calm state of the weather during the night, affording the greatest facilities for the radiation of heat, and rarely wind enough to produce refraction in the ascending currents. I have observed that generally when the temperature reaches 940 and 960 in some of the Atlantic cities, cases of coup de soleil occur. Sun-stroke does not occur here under 103°, and no fatal cases under 1050. By a reference to the meteorological tables of Professor Swallow's geologi. cal report, you will observe that the fall of rain during the summer months is much greater than at any other season, much less in the spring and autumn, and but little in the winter. The greate advantage of such conditions is appreciated at a glance, particularly by the farmer.

In the progress of time Kansas will become as proverbial for her clear sky, salubrious climate, and the good health of her citizens as Italy now is. We have none of those harassing diseases, such as diphtheria, typhoid and typhus fevers, nor any dangerous thoracic disorders, except those brought here from other climates. Scarlatina sometimes prevails, but generally in a mild form. Contagious diseases have never developed into an epidemic form. The prevalent diseases are malarial and of a periodic type.

But as the country is opened and improved, the soil turned up by the plow, even the malarial diseases vanish under the pure bright sunlight and invigorating air of our plains.

If I can serve you further in any manner, you have but to command me. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

F. HAWN. Hon. JOSEPH S. WILSON,

Commissioner General Land Office.

HELENA, MONTANA TERRITORY, May 18, 1870. SIR: I send herewith three specimens of ore. No. 1. Tin stone from Basin Gulch in Jefferson County, about twenty-five miles southwest from Helena. There are undoubtedly extensive mines of this mineral in that region, as large quantities of this stone are found in all the gulches in that locality, including the head of Ten Mile Creek.

I discovered this mineral in the spring of 1867, while engaged in prospecting for placer mines, and believe that I was the first to call attention to the existence of tin in this Territory. I have taken out quite a number of beautiful cabinet specimens of toads-eye tin stone, but have none on hand now. I have sent over there for specimens to be saved for me, which I will send you as soon as I receive them.

No. 2. Quartz containing gold and tellurium from the Granite Mountain, a patented lode at the head of Tucker Gulch, section 7, township 9 north, range 3 west, and section 12, township 9 north, range 4 west.

No. 3. Specimens of ore from the Try lode in section 32, township 10 north, range 3 west, land returned on township plat as agricultural. The proprietors of this lode are now making arrangements to apply for patent. Only small quantities of this kind of ore are found in the lode. The vein is about thirty feet in width, runs nearly northeast and southwest, dips southeast at an angle of about eighty degrees. The rock from this lode, taken from the dump without assorting, yields an average of nearly $40 per ton in gold, by a mill test of about seven tons. Men working in the lode during the past winter for the proprietors, have made more than their wages by pounding picked specimens in a hand mortar. This lode has only lately been recorded, on account of the great width preventing a proper development of one wall, as required by the territorial law. I would like to have an assay made of this piece of ore, so that I can embody it in my report when the final survey of the lot is made.

If I could have special authority from your office to obtain and send specimens, I could undoubtedly send you many valuable specimens from this Territory I remain, yours, truly,

GEO. B. FOOTE, District Deputy United States Mineral Surveyor. Hon. JOSEPH S. WILSON,

Commissioner of the General Land Office, Washington, D.O.

No. 1.— Tabular statement showing the number of acres of public lands surveyed in the fol

lowing land States and Territories up to June 30, 1869, during the last fiscal year, and the total of the public lands surreyed up to June 30, 1870; also, the total area of the public domain remaining unsurveyed within the same.

[graphic]

Total area of public lands re

maining unsurveyed, and of
course unoffered and undis-
posed of, inclusive of the area
of private land claims sur-
veyed, up to June 30, 1870.

Wisconsin.

34, 511, 360 53, 924 34, 511, 360 Iowa 35, 228, 800

34, 511, 360 55, 045 33, 228, 800 Minnesota 53, 459, 840

35, 228, 800 83, 531 25,095, 386 Kansas..

21, 161 903, 192 26,019, 739 52, 043, 520 81, 318 26, 061, 589

27, 440, 101 Nebraska

436, 126 2,671, 948 29, 169, 663 48, 636, 800

22, 873, 857 75, 995 16, 864, 145 California

2, 485, 362 120, 947, 840

19, 349, 507 29, 287, 293 188, 981 30, 878, 784 Nevada

372, 518 1,087, 076 32, 338, 378 71, 737, 741

88, 609, 462 112, 090 2,963, 127 Oregon.

858, 763 60,975, 360

3,821, 890 67, 915, 851 95, 274 8,368, 564 Washington Tery..

1,094, 694 44, 796, 160

9, 463, 258 51,512, 102 69, 994 5,063, 775 Colorado Territory..

304, 484 66, 880,000

5,36, 259

39, 427, 901 104,500 4,356, 832 Utah Territory.

3, 269, 495 54,065, 075

7, 626, 327 59, 253, 673 84, 476 2,525, 872 Arizona Territory..

685, 636 3, 211, 508 72, 906, 304

50, 853, 567 113, 916 New Mexico Tery..

086, 028 69, 134 1,006, 621 *1, 761, 783 77,568, 640

71, 144, 521 121, 201 2,982, 753 Dakota Territory..

1, 258, 106 14, 240, 859 73,327, 781 96,595, 840 150, 932 4,878, 948 Idaho Territory.

1, 165, 316 55, 228, 160

46, 044, 264 90, 551, 576 86, 294 Montana Territory..

510, 973

383, 538

894, 511

54, 333, 649 92,016, 640 143, 776 Wyoming Territory.

819, 372
186, 152

580, 021
62, 645, 120

1,585, 545 90, 431, 095 97, 883 Missouri 41, 824, 000 65, 350 41, 824, 000

62, 645, 120 Alabama

41, 824, 000 32, 462, 080 50,722 32, 462, 080 Mississippi.

32, 462, 080 30, 179, 840 47, 156 30, 179, 840 Louisiana

30, 179, 840 26, 461, 440 41,346 23, 461, 440 Arkansas

23, 465, 133 33, 406, 720

2, 996, 307 52, 198 33, 406, 720 Florida..

33, 406, 720 37, 931, 520 59, 268 26, 631, 520 Ohio

64, 915

407,333 27, 103, 768 25, 576, 960

10, 827, 752 Indiana

39, 964 25, 576, 960 21, 637, 760

25, 576, 960 33, 809 21, 637, 760 Michigan. 36, 128, 640

21, 637, 760 56, 451 36, 128, 640 Illinois. 35, 462, 400

36, 128, 640 55, 410 35, 462, 400 Indian Territory. 44, 154, 240

35, 462, 400 68, 991 Alaska 369, 529, 600

44, 154, 240 577, 390

369, 529, 600 Total.. 1, 834, 998, 2002, 867, 185 508, 567,668 1, 150, 006 18, 165, 278 527, 882, 9321, 307, 115, 448

* Of the surveys in Arizona Territory 960,504.74 acres are Navajo Indian lands, reserved by the second article of the treaty of June 1, 1868, (United States Laws, vol. 15, p. 668.)

t of the surveys in New Mexico Territory 959,810.56 acres are Navajo Indian lands, reserved by the socond article of the treaty of June 1, 1868, (United States Laws, vol. 15, p. 668.)

of the surveys in Dakota Territory 918,352.70 acres are lands of the Sisseton and Wahpeton bands of Dakota or Sioux Indians, reserved by the third article, treaty of February 19, 1867, (United States Laws, vol. 15, p. 506.)

JOS. S. WILSON, Commissioner. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

General Land Ofice, October 27, 1870.

No. 2.-Statement of public lands sold, of cash and bounty land scrip received therefor, num

sixth section of said act; also, of land located with scrip under the agricultural college and thereof, and statement of incidental expenses thereon, in the first half year of the fiscal year

[graphic]

488 19

Jackson....

*368 04

368 04

Do. Do..

*776 01

776 01

New Orleans.
Monroe
Natchitoches.

Total

*776 01

776 01

Michigan

Do.
Do.
Do.
Do..

Detroit
East Saginaw.
Ionia..
Marquette
Traverse City.

6, 038.93
10, 087.42
20, 569.91
13, 944. 40
6, 706. 24

7, 893 65 16,729 89 72,216 15 20,776 74 19, 395 82

157 14 4, 864 48

612 37

7,736 51 11, 865 41 71, 603 78 20,776 74 19, 395 82 131, 378 26

Total

57, 346.90

137, 012 25

5, 633 99

Arkansas.

Do..
Do.....

Total

Little Rock
Washington
Clarksville..

*74 12
*883 24
*541 14

74 12
883 24
541 14

*1, 498 50
*1, 036 49

1, 498 50
1,036 49

Florida
Iowa.

Do.
Do..
Do..

Tallahassee..
Fort Des Moines.
Council Bluffs.
Fort Dodge
Sioux City

242.91

153. 19 8, 269.09 96, 733. 48

355 23

291 50 18, 539 80 151, 533 45

355 23

291 50 18, 539 80 151, 533 45

Total

170, 719 98

Wisconsin

Do.
Do.
Do..
Do..
Do...

Menasha
Falls of St. Croix
Stevens' Point
La Crosse..
Bayfield.
Eau Claire.

105, 398. 67
12,897.93

8,544.25
10, 573.39

4, 711, 08
18,902. 47
22,894.60

170, 719 98
16, 273 53
18, 904 16
13, 266 89

6,052 30
33, 542 61
29, 825 25
117, 864 74

16, 273 53
18, 904 16
13, 266 89

6,052 30
33, 542 61
29, 195 57
117, 235 06

629 68

Total

78, 523.72

629 68

* Ex 'ess 82 00

ber of acres entered under the homestead law of May 20, 1862, of commissions received under mechanic act of July 2, 1862, and commissions received by registers and receivers on the value commencing July 1, 1869, and ending June 30, 1870.

[graphic]

297 00

49, 197.22

3, 280

1,310 00

4,590 00

49, 197.22

4,056 01

1, 422 39

6, 293.21 14, 638.38 23, 148.92

944. 39 15, 630.07 60, 654.97

410 1, 295 2, 250

GO 1, 465 5, 480

180 10

539 58 1,059 56

41 90 723 96

590 10 1, 834 58 3, 309 56

101 90
2, 188 96

12, 332. 14
24, 725. 80
43, 718.83
14, 888. 79
22, 336.31

8,303 65
18,024 89
74, 466 15
20,836 74
20, 860 82

1, 418 91 1, 289 15 3, 782 90 2, 308 99 3, 284 4G

2,545 10

8, 025 10 118,001. 87 142, 494 25

12,084 41

889 63 744 93 664 82

35, 250. 68 3, 160 47, 322.43 3,600 72, 512. 69 5, 925 155, 085.80 12, 685 25, 800, 272, 685

826. 68 85

760.00 100 26, 610.95 3, 060 57, 121.04 6,005 85, 318. 67 9, 250

4, 270.89 355 24, 169.05 1,890

3,765. 03 310 30, 587.26 2, 295 21, 529. 29

1,690 84, 321. 52 6,540

1,599 38

520 72

1,133 90
1, 308 55
2, 101 01
4,543 46
1,032 00

38 79

98 70 1, 452 87 2, 428 0

4, 293 90 35, 250. 68 3, 234 12 4,908 55 47,322. 43 4, 483 24 8, 026 01 72, 512. 69 6, 466 14 17, 228 46 155, 085. 80 14, 183 50 3, 737 00 25, 800. 27 3,721 49

123 79 1,069.59 440 23

198 70 913. 19 391 50 4, 512 87 34, 880.04 21, 599 80

8, 43300 153, 654.52 157, 538 45 13, 268 36 | 190, 717.34 179, 969 98 512 23 17, 168. 82

16, 628 53 2, 685 65 32, 713.30 20, 794 16

424 29 14, 338.42 13, 576 89 3,419 98 35, 298.34 8,347 30

18, 902. 47 33, 542 61 2, 388 60 44, 423.89 31, 515 25

803 42

505 82 1, 154 40 3, 252 95

16, 317.64

408 00 408 00

4,018 36

16, 317. 64

5, 716 59

157 23
793 65

114 28
1, 154 98

855 22 1, 040 70

830 32

620 06 1, 969 74 1,358 08 6, 674 12

698 60 2,918 74

9 458 74 162, 845. 24 124, 404 74

payments.

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