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that a sinall auxiliary force would enable him to compel General Prevost to relinquish his conquest in the South, General Lincoln, in concert with Governour Ratledge and the French Consul at Charleston, wrote to the Count D'Estaing, who still remained with his fleet in the West Indies, arging him to join in the proposed enterprise. The Count, always ready to obey the calls of duty or of honour, instantly prepared to set sail for the American coast, where he arrived on the 1st of September with forty-one sail, haying on board ten regiments, amounting to about 6000 men. Two ships of the line and three frigates, having on board Major General Fontanges, were sent in advance to Charleston, to announce his approach, and to afford an opportunity for the Governour and General Lincoln to concert a plan of operations with the French General.

The unexpected appearance of the French fleet produced no little alarm to the British naval force on the Georgia station. Three of their ships, ignorant of the Count's approach until too late to escape, fell into his hands; and the rest sought their safety by running up the Savannah river. Governour Rutledge took the most prompt and active measures to collect and embody the militia, which joined the American General, by regiments, as they came in; while at the same time he afforded all the facilities in his power to the French Admiral, for landing his troops by send. ing off to his fleet, the shallops and small vessels that could be collected. The Count D'Estaing landed three thousand of his men at Beaulieu on the 13th of September, which were joined on the 15th by Pulaski's Legion.

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1:

VOL. II.

CHAPTER XI.

Events of 1779 continued— The Count D'Estaing arrives on the

coast of Georgia with the French fleet.-Lands his army, and is joined by General Lincoln before Savannah.-The Siege of Sarannah--The Confederate Generals attempt to storm the works and are repulsed.-Count Pulaski is mortally wounded. The Siege is raised and the allied armies retreat.-Count D’Estaing sails for the West Indiesr-Extraordinary enterprise of Colonel White Expedition of Colonel Clarke against Lieutenant Governour Hamilton. Of Colonel Goose Van Schaiek. General Sullivan sent against the Six Nations.-Attacks the Indians and Tories at Newtown, and suffers them to escape.Lays waste the Indian Country, and returns to Head Quarters.Resigns his commission.---Brandt destroys the Minisink Settlements.-Captain M Donald captures Freland's Fort Expedition of General Williams against the Creeks.-Spain declares War against England Expedition of the Spanish Governour of Louisiana, and his recognition of American Independence.

We have shown that the British General Prevost, after having marched almost without opposition from Savannah to the metropolis of South Carolina, and refusing the most advantageous treaty of neutrality offered by its inhabitants, withdrew his forces without venturing an assault and retired to his possessions in Georgia. The intense heat of the season which immediately succeeded, put a stop to all active operations in both armies, and for several months, General Lincoln had full leisure to prepare for the renewal of the campaign. Knowing from the situation of Washington, that it was not in his power to spare any considerable reinforcements from his army, and being convinced from the feeble condition of the enemy,

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that a sinall auxiliary force would enable him to compel General Prevost to relinquish his conquest in the South, General Lincoln, in concert with Governour Rutledge and the French Consul at Charleston, wrote to the Count D'Estaing, who still remained with his fleet in the West Indies, urging him to join in the proposed enterprise. The Count, always ready to obey the calls of duty or of honour, instantly prepared to set sail for the American coast, where he arriv. ed on the 1st of September with forty-one sail, haying on board ten regiments, amounting to about 6000

Two ships of the line and three frigates, having on board Major General Fontanges, were sent in advance to Charleston, to announce his approach, and to afford an opportunity for the Governour and General Lincoln to concert a plan of operations with the French General.

The unexpected appearance of the French fleet produced no little alarm to the British naval force on the Georgia station. Three of their ships, ignorant of the Count's approach until too late to escape, fell into his hands; and the rest sought their safety by

; running up the Savannah river. Governour Rutledge took the most prompt and active measures to collect and embody the militia, which joined the American General, by regiments, as they came in; while at the same time he afforded all the facilities in his power to the French Admiral, for landing his troops by sending off to his fleet, the shallops and small vessels that could be collected. The Count D'Estaing landed three thousand of his men at Beaulien on the 13th of September, which were joined on the 15th by Pulas. ki's Legion.

34

VOL. II.

General Lincoln, in the mean time, put his army in motion, and crossed the Savannah at Zubly's ferry, on the 9th ; but owing to the extensive swamps and creeks, which lay in his route, and the destruction of all the bridges by the enemy in their retreat, his progress was so interupted, that he did not effect a junction with the Count's troops until the 16th, when the united armies met before the town of Savannah. Gene. ral Prevost had employed the short interval allowed him, between the unlooked for appearance of the French fleet, and the union of the two armies in front of Savannah, in making the most active and vigorous preparations of defence. Lieutenant Colonels Maitland and Cruger had been ordered in from the advanced posts which they occupied, and the naval commander having dismantled his squadron, repaired to Savannah with his guns, marines and sailors. Their engineer officer, Major Moncrieff, was assiduously engaged in strengthening the old and erecting new works, in the labour of wbich he was assisted by two hundred negroes, and every thing evinced a determi

; nation on the part of the British General, to meet the contest with manly resistance.

The Count D'Estaing having arrived before the town previous to the junction of the allied armies, had summoned the garrison to surrender in the name of his master alone, probably from mere inadvertence, to which the British General declined to answer, al. leging truly that the Count was not combating for the French sovereign only. The summons was repeated in the appropriate style by the united Generals, and Prevost denjanded a truce for twenty-four hours, that he might be allowed time to adjust the terms of surrender. His only object, however, was to pro

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