The Works of Alexander Pope, Esq, Količina 6

Sprednja platnica
J. and P. Knapton, 1751
 

Mnenja - Napišite recenzijo

Na običajnih mestih nismo našli nobenih recenzij.

Druge izdaje - Prikaži vse

Pogosti izrazi in povedi

Priljubljeni odlomki

Stran 325 - ... to consider him attentively in comparison with Virgil above all the ancients, and with Milton above all the moderns.
Stran 313 - Who can be so prejudiced in their favour as to magnify the felicity of those ages, when a spirit of revenge and cruelty, joined with the practice of rapine and robbery, reigned through the world ; when no mercy was...
Stran 303 - How fertile will that imagination appear which was able to clothe all the properties of elements, the qualifications of the mind, the virtues and vices, in forms and persons, and to introduce them into actions agreeable to the nature of the things they shadowed?
Stran 278 - I CANNOT think it extravagant to imagine that mankind are no less in proportion accountable for the ill use of their dominion over creatures of the lower rank of beings than for the exercise of tyranny over their own species.
Stran 331 - ... something between penetration and felicity, he hits upon that particular point on which the bent of each argument turns, or the force of each motive depends.
Stran 334 - ... upon the judgments of that body of men whereof he was a member. They have ever had a standard to themselves, upon other principles than those of Aristotle.
Stran 310 - ... of a trumpet. They roll along as a plentiful river, always in motion, and always full ; while we are borne away by a tide of...
Stran 289 - Nay, to that perfection is he arrived, that he stoops as he walks. The figure of the man is odd enough; he is a lively little creature, with long arms and legs : a spider is no ill emblem of him : he has been taken at a distance for a small windmill.
Stran 300 - If some things are too luxuriant it is owing to the richness of the soil; and if others are not arrived to perfection or maturity, it is only because they are overrun and oppressed by those of a stronger nature.
Stran 45 - ... twixt reading and Bohea, To muse, and spill her solitary Tea, Or o'er cold coffee trifle with the spoon, Count the slow clock, and dine exact at noon; Divert her eyes with pictures in the fire, Hum half a tune, tell stories to the squire; Up to her godly garret after sev'n, There starve and pray, for that's the way to heav'n.

Bibliografski podatki