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of the sentence or decree and of all the proceedings in the case shall if demanded be delivered to the commander, or agent of the said vessel without any delay, he paying the legal fees for the same.

EDITOR'S NOTE.-Identical provisions are contained in the following treaties:

United States and Colombia, October 3, 1824, article 21.
United States and Central American Federation, December 5, 1825,

article 23.
United States and Brazil, December 12, 1828, article 23.
United States and Mexico, April 5, 1831, article 25.
United States and Chile, May 16, 1832, article 21.
United States and Venezuela, January 20, 1836, article 24.
United States and Peru and Bolivia, November 30, 1836, article 20.
Venezuela and Hansa Towns, May 27, 1837, article 19.
United States and Ecuador, June 13, 1839, article 24.
Chile and New Granada, February 16, 1844, article 23.
United States and New Granada, December 12, 1846, article 24.
Hansa Towns and Guatemala, June 25, 1847, article 20.
United States and Guatemala, March 3, 1849, article 23.
United States and Salvador, January 2, 1850, article 24.
United States and Peru, July 26, 1851, article 30.
Hansa Towns and New Granada, June 3, 1854, article 20.
Spain, and Dominican Republic, February 18, 1855, article 28.
Spain and Sicily, March 26, 1856, article 25.
United States and Bolivia, May 13, 1858, article 24.
Venezuela and Hansa Towns, March 31, 1860, article 20.
United States and Venezuela, August 27, 1860, article 21
France and Peru, March 9, 1861, article 25.
United States and Haiti, November 3, 1864, article 28.
United States and Dominican Republic, February 8, 1867, article 22.
Prussia and Mexico, August 28, 1869, article 19.
Colombia and Peru, February 10, 1870, article 26.
United States and Peru, September 6, 1870, article 27.
United States and Salvador, December 6, 1870, article 24.
Argentina and Peru, March 9, 1874, article 28.

United States and Peru, August 31, 1887, article 25.
ART. 23. (Supra, No. 6, Art. 19.]

ART. 24. When the ships of war of the two contracting parties, or those belonging to their citizens, which are armed in war, shall be admitted to enter with their prizes the ports of either of the two parties, the said public or private ships, as well as their prizes, shall not be obliged to pay any duty either to the officers of the place, the judges or any others: Nor shall such prizes, when they come to, and enter the ports of either party, be arrested or seized, nor shall the Officers of the place, make examination concerning the lawfulness of such prizes; but they may hoist sail at any time, and depart, and carry their prizes, to the places expressed in their commissions, which the commanders of such ships of war shall be obliged to shew. It is always understood that the stipulations of this article shall not extend beyond the priviledges of the most favored nation.

EDITOR'S NOTE.-Identical provisions are contained in the following treaties:

United States and Venezuela, August 27, 1860, article 23.
United States and Haiti, November 3, 1864, article 29.

United States and Dominican Republic, February 8, 1867, article 23. ART. 25. (Supra, No. 1, Art. 24 (22).]

No. 13

UNITED STATES AND TRIPOLI Treaty of Peace and Amity, signed at Tripoli, June 4, 1805; ratified by the United States April 12, 1806.

Text from 2 Miller, Treaties of the United States, page 529.
ART. 4. (Supra, No. 9, Art. 2.)
ART. 5. (Supra, No. 9, Art. 3.]

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ART. 6. Proper passports shall immediately be given to the vessels of both the contracting parties, on condition that the Vessels of War belonging to the Regency of Tripoli on meeting with merchant Vessels belonging to Citizens of the United States of America, shall not be permitted to visit them with more than two persons besides the rowers, these two only shall be permitted to go on board said Vessel, without first obtaining leave from the Commander of said Vessel, who shall compare the passport, and immediately permit said Vessel to proceed on her voyage; and should any of the said Subjects of Tripoli insult or molest the Commander or any other person on board a Vessel so visited; or plunder any of the property contained in her; On complaint being made by the Consul of the United States of America resident at Tripoli and on his producing sufficient proof to substantiate the fact, The Commander or Rais of said Tripoline Ship or Vessel of War, as well as the Offenders shall be punished in the most exemplary manner.

All Vessels of War belonging to the United States of America on meeting with
a Cruizer belonging to the Regency of Tripoli, and having seen her passport and
Certificate from the Consul of the United States of America residing in the
Regency, shall permit her to proceed on her Cruize unmolested, and without de-
tention. No passport shall be granted by either party to any Vessels, but such
as are absolutely the property of Citizens or Subjects of said contracting parties,
on any pretence whatever.

EDITOR'S NOTE.-Identical provisions are contained in the treaty between
the United States and Algiers, June 30, 1815, article 7.
Art. 7. [Supra, No. 9, Art. 5)
ART. 10. (Supra, No. 9, Art. 8]

Art. 17. If any of the Barbary States, or other powers at War with the United
States of America, shall capture any American Vessel, and send her into any of the
ports of the Regency of Tripoli, they shall not be permitted to sell her, but shall
be obliged to depart the Port on procuring the requisite supplies of Provisions;
and no duties shall be exacted on the sale of Prizes captured by Vessels sailing
under the Flag of the United States of America when brought into any Port in the
Regency of Tripoli.

EDITOR'S NOTE.-Substantially the same provisions are contained in the treaty between the United States and Algiers, June 30, 1815, article 18.

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UNITED STATES AND ALGIERS

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Treaty of Peace signed at Algiers June 30 and July 3, 1815; ratified
by the United States December 21, 1815.

Text from 2 Miller, Treaties of the United States, page 585.
ART. 5. (Supra, No. 9, Art. 2.)

ART. 6. If any Citizens or subjects belonging to either party shall be found on
board a prize vessel taken from an Enemy by the other party, such Citizens or
subjects shall be liberated immediately, and in no case or on any pretence what-
ever shall any American Citizen be kept in Captivity or Confinement, or the
property of any American Citizen found on board of any vessel belonging to any
nation with which Algiers may be at War, be detained from its lawful owners
after the exhibition of sufficient proofs of american Citizenship, and American
property, by the Consul of the United States residing at Algiers.

ART. 7. [Supra, No. 13, Art. 6.]
ART. 8. [Supra, No. 9, Art. 5.]
ART. 11. (Supra, No. 9, Art. 8.]
Art. 18. [Supra, No. 13, Art. 17.)

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No. 15

hall

UNITED STATES AND SWEDEN AND NORWAY

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Treaty of Friendship and Commerce, signed at Stockholm, September 4, 1816; ratifications exchanged at Stockholm, September 25, 1818.

Text from 2 Miller, Treaties of the United States, page 601.

ART. 13. Considering the distance of the respective countries of the two high contracting parties and the uncertainty that results therefrom in relation to

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the various events which may take place, it is agreed that a merchant-vessel belonging to one of the contracting parties and destined to a port supposed to be blockaded at the time of her departure, shall not, however, be captured or condemned for having a first time attempted to enter the said port, unless it may be proved that the said vessel could and ought to have learned on her passage, that the place in question continued to be in a state of blockade. But vessels which, after having been once turned away, shall attempt a second time during the same voyage to enter the same port of the enemy while the blockade continues, shall be liable to detention and condemnation.

EDITOR'S NOTE.—Identical provisions are contained in the following treaties:

United States and Sweden and Norway, July 4, 1827, article 18.
United States and Prussia, May 1, 1828, article 13.
United States and Greece, December 10-22, 1837, article 16.
United States and Sardinia, November 26, 1838, article 13.
Sardinia and Prussia, June 23, 1845, article 13.

Prussia and Sicily, January 22, 1847, article 16. Substantially the same provisions are contained in the treaty between the United States and Sicily, October 1, 1855, article 2, which adds, at the end of the article, the following:

“By blockaded port, is understood one into which, by the disposition of the power which attacks it with a proportionate number of ships sufficiently near, there is evident danger in entering.”

No. 16

UNITED STATES AND COLOMBIA Treaty of Peace, Amity, Navigation, and Commerce, signed at Bogotá, October 3, 1824; ratifications exchanged at Washington, May 27, 1825.

Text from 3 Miller, Treaties of the United States, p. 163.10

ART. 12. It shall be lawful for the Citizens of the United States of America and of the Republic of Colombia to sail with their Ships with all manner of liberty and security, no distinction being made who are the proprietors of the merchandizes laden thereon, from any port to the places of those who now are or hereafter shall be at enmity with either of the Contracting parties. It shall likewise be lawful for the citizens aforesaid to sail with the ships and merchandizes before mentioned and to trade with the same liberty and security from the places, ports, and havens of those who are enemies of both or either party, without any opposition or disturbance whatsoever, not only directly from the places of the enemy beforementioned to neutral places, but also from one place belonging to an enemy to another place belonging to an enemy, whether they be under the jurisdiction of one power or under several. And it is hereby stipulated that free Ships shall also give freedom to goods, and that every thing shall be deemed to be free and exempt, which shall be found on board the Ships belonging to the Citizens of either of the Contracting parties, although the whole lading or any part thereof should appertain to the enemies of either, Contraband goods being always excepted. It is also agreed in like manner that the same liberty be extended to persons, who are on board a free ship, with this effect that although they be enemies to both or either party, they are not to be taken out of that free Ship, unless they are officers or soldiers and in the actual service of the enemies; Provided however and it is hereby agreed that the stipulations in this Article contained declaring that the flag shall cover the property, shall be understood as applying to those powers only, who recognize this principle, but if either of the two contracting parties shall be at war with a third and the other neutral, the flag of the neutral shall cover the property of enemies, whose governments acknowledge this principle and not of others.

EDITOR'S NOTE.—Identical provisions are contained in the following treaties:

United States and Central American Federation, December 25, 1825,

article 14.
United States and Brazil, December 12, 1828, article 14.
United States and Mexico, April 5, 1831, article 16.

United States and Chile, May 16, 1832, article 12. 10 Also in 12 British and Foreign State Papers, p. 782.

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United States and Venezuela, January 20, 1836, article 15.
United States and Peru and Bolivia, November 30, 1836, article 11.
United States and Ecuador, June 13, 1839, article 15.
Chile and New Granada, February 16, 1844, article 14.
United States and New Granada, December 12, 1846, article 15.
United States and Guatemala, March 3, 1849, article 14.
United States and Salvador, January 2, 1850, article 15.
United States and Peru, July 26, 1851, article 21.
United States and Peru, September 6, 1870, article 18.
United States and Salvador, December 6, 1870, article 15.
United States and Italy, February 26, 1871, article 16.

United States and Peru, August 31, 1887, article 17. ART. 13. It is likewise agreed that in the case, where the neutral Flag of one of the Contracting Parties shall protect the property of the Enemies of the other, by virtue of the above Stipulation, it shall always be understood that the neutral property found on board such Enemy's Vessels, shall be held and considered as Enemy's property, and as such shall be liable to detention and confiscation, except such property as was put on board such Vessel before the Declaration of War, or even afterwards, if it were done without the knowledge of it, but the Contracting Parties agree, that two months having elapsed after the Declaration, their Citizens shall not plead ignorance thereof. On the contrary, if the Flag of the Neutral does not protect the Enemy's property, in that case the goods and merchandises of the Neutral'embarked in such Enemy's Ships, shall be free.

EDITOR'S NOTE.—Identical provisions are contained in the following treaties:

United States and Central American Federation, December 5, 1823,

article 15.
United States and Brazil, December 12, 1828, article 15.
United States and Mexico, April 5, 1831, article 17.
United States and Chile, May 16, 1832, article 13.
United States and Venezuela, January 20, 1836, article 16.
United States and Peru and Bolivia, November 30, 1836, article 12.
United States and Ecuador, June 13, 1839, article 16.
Chile and New Granada, February 16, 1844, article 15.
United States and New Granada, December 12, 1846, article 16.
United States and Guatemala, March 3, 1849, article 15.
United States and Salvador, January 2, 1850, article 16.
United States and Peru, July 26, 1851, article 22.
United States and Peru, September 6, 1870, article 19.

United States and Salvador, December 6, 1870, article 16. The identical provision contained in the treaty between the United States and Peru, July 26, 1851, article 22, has been revoked and annulled by the

treaty between the same parties, July 22, 1856, article 2, infra No. 21. Art. 14. This liberty of navigation and commerce shall extend to all kinds of merchandises excepting those only which are distinguished by the name of contraband and under this name of contraband or prohibited goods shall be comprehended:

1st. Cannons, mortars, howitzers, swivels, blunderbusses, muskets, fuzees, rifles, carbines, pistols, pikes, swords, sabres, lances, spears, halberds, and grenades, bombs, powder, matches, balls, and all other things belonging to the use of

2dly. Bucklers, helmets, breastplates, coats of mail, infantry belts, and clothes made up in the form and for a military use;

3dly. Cavalry belts, and horses with their furniture;

4thly. And generally all kinds of arms and instruments of iron, steel, brass, and copper or of any other materials, manufactured, prepared, and formed expressly to make war by sea or land.

EDITOR'S NOTE.—Identical provisions are contained in the following treaties:

United States and Central American Federation, December 5, 1825,

article 16.
United States and Brazil, December 12, 1828, article 16.
United States and Mexico, April 5, 1831, article 18.
United States and Chile, May 16, 1832, article 14.

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United States and Venezuela, January 20, 1836, article 17.
United States and Peru and Bolivia, November 30, 1836, article 13.
United States and Ecuador, June 13, 1839, article 17.
Chile and New Granada, February 16, 1844, article 16.
United States and Guatemala, March 3, 1849, article 16.

Sardinia and Chile, June 28, 1856, article 24.
Substantially the same provisions are contained in the following treaties:

United States and New Granada, December 12, 1846, article 17.
United States and Salvador, January 2, 1850, article 17.
United States and Salvador, December 6, 1870, article 17.
These treaties contain an additional category of contraband as follows:

“5. Provisions that are imported into a besieged or blockaded

place.”
United States and Peru, July 26, 1851, article 23.
United States and Bolivia, May 13, 1858, article 17.
United States and Haiti, November 3, 1864, article 20.
United States and Dominican Republic, February 8, 1867, article 13.
United States and Peru, September 6, 1870, article 20.

These treaties specify, in category_4, arms whether “offensive or
defensive.” The United States and Peru treaty of 1870 adds to the
arms enumerated in category 1, "torpedoes.”
Brazil and Uruguay, October 12, 1851, article 11.
Portugal and Argentina, August 9, 1852, article 17.
Argentina and Brazil, March 7, 1856, article 11.
Brazil and Paraguay, April 6, 1856, article 14.
Argentina and Paraguay, July 29, 1856, article 5.

These treaties omit copper from the materials enumerated in cate

United States and Italy, February 26, 1871, article 15, enumerates the following goods in category 2: "Infantry belts, implements of war and defensive weapons, cloth cut or made up in a military form and for

military use. ART. 15. All other merchandises and things not comprehended in the articles of contraband esplicitly enumerated and classified as above, shall be held and considered as free, and subjects of free and lawful Commerce, so that they may be carried and transported in the freest manner by both the Contracting Parties even to Places belonging to an Enemy, excepting only those Places which are at that time besieged or blocked up; and to avoid all doubt in this particular it is declared that those Places only are besieged or blockaded, which are actually attacked by a Belligerent force capable of preventing the entry of the Neutral.

Editor's NOTE.—Identical provisions are contained in the following treaties:

United States and Central American Federation, December 5, 1825,

article 17.
United States and Brazil, December 12, 1828, article 17.
United States and Mexico, April 5, 1831, article 19.
United States and Chile, May 16, 1832, article 15.
United States and Venezuela, January 20, 1836, article 18.
United States and Peru and Bolivia, November 30, 1836, article 14.
United States and Ecuador, June 13, 1839, article 18.
Chile and New Granada, February 16, 1844, article 17.
United States and New Granada, December 12, 1846, article 18.
United States and Guatemala, March 3, 1849, article 17.
United States and Salvador, January 2, 1850, article 18.
United States and Peru, July 26, 1851, article 24.
United States and Bolivia, May 13, 1858, article 18.
United States and Peru, September 6, 1870, article 21.
United States and Salvador, December 6, 1870, article 18.

United States and Peru, August 31, 1887, article 19.
Substantially the same provisions are contained in the following treaties:

United States and Haiti, November 3, 1864, article 21.
United States and Dominican Republic, February 8, 1867, article 14.
These two treaties do not contain the last sentence of this article, defining
a blockaded place.

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