The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL. D.: With an Essay on His Life and Genius, Količina 1

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A. V. Blake, 1846
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A criticism on Miltons versification
88
Sophia Heedful
93
An inquiry how far Milton has accommo
94
Modish pleasures
100
The vanity of an authors expectations
106
RASSELAS a Tale
108
Too much nicety not to be indulged
112
The narrowness of fame
118
173
126
The difficulty of educating a young noble
132
88
140
The danger of attempting wit in conversa
141
The laws of writing not always indisputable
156
99
157
Old men in danger of falling into pupilage
162
107
168
The majority are wicked
175
Directions to authors attacked by critics The various degrees of critical perspi cacity
176
An account of a club of antiquaries
177
Many advantages not to be enjoyed together
178
The awkward merriment of a student
179
The study of life not to be neglected for the sake of books
180
The history of an adventurer in lotteries 272
183
The subject of essays often suggested by chance Chance equally prevalent in other affairs
184
The prohibition of revenge justifiable by reason The meanness of regulating our conduct by the opinions of
185
Anningait and Ajut a Greenland history
186
The history of Anningait and Ajut con cluded
187
Favour often gained with little assistance from understanding
188
The mischiefs of falsehood
189
The character THE ADVENTURER 34 Story of Mysargyras 39 Sleep 280 281 of Turpicula 283 190 The history of Abouzaid the son of Morad 284
191
Love unsuccessful without riches 288
192
The authors art of praising himself
193
A young noblemans progress in politeness 289
195
Human opinions mutable The hopes of youth fallacious
196
The history of Seged concluded
205
The art of living at the cost of others
206
The folly of continuing too long upon the stage
207
The Ramblers reception His design
208
58 Criticism 62 Letter of Mysargyras 7 The useful arts as applied to the wants ne cessities and superfluities of life
215
true
218
Misery the lot of man and our present state one of danger and infelicity
279
Proposal for a female army 6 Ladys performance on horseback 7 Scheme for news writers 8 Plan of military discipline 9 Progress of idleness
286
Robbery of time 12 Marriages why advertised 13 The imaginary housewife
292
Treacles complaint of his wife
293
Druggets retirement
294
Expedients of Idlers 18 Dragget vindicated 19 Whirlers character
296
Perditas complaint of her father 317 43 Monitions on the flight of time 318 44 Use of memory 320 45 Portraits defended 297 20 Louisbourgs history
297
Lingers history of listlessness
299
Imprisonment of debtors 23 Uncertainty of friendship 24 Man does not always think 25 New actors on the theatre 26 Betty Brooms history 27 Power...
302
Wedding dayGrocers wifeChairman
304
Betty Brooms history 30 Corruption of news writers
305
Disguises of idlenessSobers character
306
Sleep 33 Journal of a fellow of a college 34 Punch and conversation 35 Auction hunter 36 The terrific diction
308
Iron and gold
310
Debtors in Prison
311
The bracelet 40 Art of advertising
313
On the death of a friend
314
Deborah Gingers account of city wits 48 The bustles of Idleness 49 Marvels journey 50 Marvel paralleled 51 Domestic greatness unattainable 52 Self...
322
Authors mortifications
330
Virtuosos whimsical 334 57 Character of Sophron the prudent
334
Expectations of pleasure frustrated
335
Books fall into neglect
337
378
378
48
400
ib 357 358 359 360 361
412
Prologue to the Comedy of A Word to
422
ib Verses written at the request of a Gentleman
555
399
568

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Stran xv - is recommended to the public, were written by your lordship. To be so distinguished, is an honour, which, being very little accustomed to favours from the great, I know not well how to receive, or in what terms to acknowledge.
Stran xv - Seven years, my lord, have now passed since I waited in your outward rooms, or was repulsed from your door; during which time I have been pushing on my work through difficulties, of which it is useless to complain, and have brought it at last to the verge of publication, without one act of assistance, one word of encouragement, or one smile of favour. Such treatment I did not expect, for I never had a patron before.
Stran 215 - So much I feel my genial spirits droop, My hopes all flat, nature within me seems In all her functions weary of herself ; My race of glory run, and race of shame, And I shall shortly be with them that rest.
Stran xxiii - Ay, but to die, and go we know not where ; To lie in cold obstruction, and to rot ; This sensible warm motion to become A kneaded clod ; and the delighted spirit To bathe in fiery floods...
Stran iv - He appears by bis modest and unaffected narration to have described things as he saw them, to have copied nature from the life, and to have consulted his senses, not his imagination; he meets with no basilisks that destroy with their eyes, his crocodiles devour their prey without tears, and his cataracts fall from the rock without deafening the neighbouring inhabitants.
Stran 103 - ... more knowledge may be gained of a man's real character by a short conversation with one of his servants, than from a formal and studied narrative, begun with his pedigree and ended with his funeral.
Stran 110 - Thus forlorn and distressed, he wandered through the wild, without knowing whither he was going, or whether he was every moment drawing nearer to safety, or to destruction. At length, not fear, but labour, began to overcome him; his breath grew short, and his knees trembled ; and he was on the point of lying down in resignation to his fate, when he beheld, through the brambles, the glimmer of a taper.
Stran xv - Is not a Patron, my Lord, one who looks with unconcern on a man struggling for life in the water and, when he has reached ground, encumbers him with help...
Stran 110 - In a short time we remit our fervour, and endeavour to find some mitigation of our duty, and some more easy means of obtaining the same end. We then relax our vigour, and resolve no longer to be terrified with crimes at a distance, but rely upon our own constancy, and venture to approach what we resolve never to touch.
Stran 78 - All the performances of human art, at which we look with praise or wonder, are instances of the resistless force of perseverance : it is by this that the quarry becomes a pyramid, and that distant countries are united with canals.

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