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106. Cereals.

Mr. HENDRY. The cereals of America with special reference to California and Pacific

Coast conditions. It is highly desirable that the student should

have finished Botany 3 before entering upon the course. 5 hrs., first half-year; 3 units. Lectures, Tu Th, 9; laboratory, Th, 2-5.

108. Agrostology.

Assistant Professor KENNEDY. Morphology and taxonomy of grasses and legumes in their relations

to agriculture. 5 hrs., second half-year; 3 units. Lectures, Tu Th, 9; laboratory, Tu,

2–5. Prerequisite: Botany 2, 3, and 104B.

118. Farm Management.

Assistant Professor ADAMS. A survey of the business aspects of land management. The relation

of capital, choice of land, farm equipment, farm layout, cropping systems, labor, marketing and farm accounts of specific agricultural industries, both special and general. The correlation and application of agricultural principles to specific problems. Designed for students who wish a general knowledge of the business aspects

of farming. Open only to seniors. 5 hrs., first half-year; 3 units. Lectures, WF, 9; demonstrations, S,

9-11.

119. Farm Management.

Assistant Professor ADAMS. Advanced and special problems supplementing course 118, designed

for students who desire additional training in the subject. Open

only to seniors. 2 hrs., first half-year. M, 10–12. 120. Crop Production.

Professor GILMORE. Field practices and experimental methods of crop production, crop

management, maintenance of fertility, and miscellaneous crops.

Lectures and assigned readings and problems. 3 hrs., second half-year. Tu Th S, 10. Prerequisite: Soil Technology 1.

122. Textile Raw Materials.

Professor GILMORE. Fibres of commerce and those having commerical possibilities; the

physical and chemical qualities and characteristics of fibres and their preparation for use on filatures, cordage, and fa Lectures and demonstrations. May be taken by students in home

economics. 2 hrs., second half-year. Tu Th, 9. Prerequisite: Chemistry 1A-1B,

Botany 2 and 3.

130. Conference--Special Topics.

Professor GILMORE and STAFF. Presentation of reports and papers with discussions on subjects

assigned. 2 hrs., first half-year; 1 unit. W, 4-6.

131. Thesis.

Professor GILMORE and STAFF. Study of literature with laboratory or field investigations on problems

assigned. Throughout the year; 1 to 2 units each half-year. 200. Advanced Agronomy.

Professor GILMORE. Original investigation of problems in crop production. Units and hours to be arranged.

201. Advanced Agrostology.

Assistant Professor KENNEDY. Original investigation of forage crops and problems.

Units and hours to be arranged. 202. Advanced Farm Management.

Assistant Professor ADAMS. Original investigation of problems in farm management. Units and hours to be arranged.

(Given at Davis) 100. Advanced Practice.

Assistant Professor MADSON. Practice and correlated problems in crop production as conducted in

the field with experimental plots. 9 hrs., second half-year; 3 units.

107. Forage Crops.

Assistant Professor KENNEDY. The plants which produce feed for live-stock; their characteristics,

adaptations and culture methods; the principles underlying the maintenance of meadows, pastures and ranges. Lectures and

demonstrations. 5 hrs., second half-year; 3 units. M, 11; Tu, 9; M, 1-4.

111. Field Practice. Assistant Professor MADSON and Mr. HENDRY. Field studies with work on tabulation and correlation of operations

and results. Designed to give the student an intimate knowledge of the various types and varieties of field crops and the cultural

methods involved in their production. 9 hrs., second half-year; 3 units. WF, 1-5:30.

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 99. Practice in Animal Husbandry.

Professor TRUE and STAFF. Summer practice course at the University Farm for students with a

major in animal husbandry. Work is adapted to the needs of the individual student. For those unfamiliar with the handling of farm livestock, practice is given. For those who have had this experience, work is offered dealing with that type of animal

husbandry which the student expects to follow in after life. 6 weeks beginning the day after Commencement. 6 units.

UPPER DIVISION COURSES

(Given at Berkeley) 100. Farm Animals.

Professor TRUE. A general course on the breeds and the care and management of farm

animals, designed especially for students not having a major in

animal husbandry. 3 hrs., first half-year. M Tu W, 4.

(Given at Davis) 101. Management of Farm Animals. Assistant Professor MILLER. The care and management of horses, beef cattle, dairy cattle, sheep

and hogs; lectures and practice work in feeding and care of

animals at the barn and fitting stock for exhibition purposes. 2 lectures and 2 laboratory periods; 4 units. One laboratory period

will include stable practice with the different classes of live stock at the University Farm.

102. Feeding of Farm Animals.

Assistant Professor MILLER. The principles of feeding farm animals; a study of the common feed

stuffs and their uses with respect to horses, beef cattle, dairy cattle, sheep and hogs.

105. Dairy Cattle and Hogs.

Professor TRUE and Assistant Professor THOMPSON. Lectures on the origin, history and development of breeds and practice

work in judging. 6 hrs., second half-year; 4 units. Lectures, Tu Th, 10; laboratory

Tu Th, 1–3.

106. Beef Cattle, Horses and Sheep.

Assistant Professors THOMPSON and MILLER. A continuation of course 105. 6 hrs., second half-year; 4 units. Lectures, Tu Th, 10; laboratory,

Tu Th, 1–3.

107. Breeding Farm Animals.

Assistant Professor THOMPSON. Lectures and recitations on the principles of breeding, including dis

cussions of heredity, atavism, reversion, inbreeding, line breeding, and the application of these principles to the practice of breeding

farm animals. 3 hrs., second half-year. Tu W Th, 9.

108. Milk Production.

Mr. VOORHIES. Lectures and recitations on the types of dairies, advanced registry

systems, dairy laws and inspection, calf raising, plans for dairy

buildings; discussion of the milch goat industry. 3 hrs., second half-year. Tu Th F, 11.

109. Seminar.

Professor TRUE. Bi-weekly topics and discussions of special problems in animal breed

ing and management. 2 hrs., second half-year; 1 unit.

110. Seminar.

Professor WOLL. Bi-weekly topics and discussions of special problems in animal feeding. 2 hrs., second half-year; 1 unit.

CITRICULTURE

99. Practice in Citriculture.

Professor Coil and Assistant Professor CONDIT. A traveling practice course in citrus and other semi-tropical fruits,

designed to bring the student into active contact with the great fruit industries of the state and to give him some actual practice

in as many of the operations of fruit production as practicable. Six weeks. Daily, except Sunday, beginning the day after commence

ment; 6 units. This course or its equivalent is required for graduation of those specializing in citriculture. Prerequisite: two years' study in a university or college course.

101. Citrus Fruits.

Professor COIT. A detailed study of the citrus fruits; propagation, location and

management of orchards, orchard heating, harvesting, packing storing, marketing, and pest control. Lectures, assigned readings

and reports. 4 hrs., second half-year. Tu Th S, 8; Th, 4.

102. Semi-Tropical Fruits.

Assistant Professor CONDIT. A detailed study of the semi-tropical fruits grown in California, in

cluding the olive, date, fig, avocado, guava, loquat, mango, feijoa, and others. Classification, morphology, propagation, culture, harvesting, packing, etc. Lectures, assigned readings and laboratory

work. 6 hrs., first half-year; 4 units. Lectures, Tu Th S, 11; laboratory,

sections I, M, 9-12; II, Tu, 2-5.

103. Pro-seminar.

Professor COIT. Assigned special topics requiring extended research into pomological

literature. Reports and discussions. Required of and limited to regular and graduate students electing citriculture as the major

subject. 2 hrs., either half-year. M, 3–5.

104. Citrus Investigations.

Professor COIT Special problems. 3 or 6 hrs., either half-year; 1 or 2 units. Hours to be arranged.

Prerequisite: senior standing in the College of Agriculture.

105. Advanced Citrus Fruits.

Professor Cort and Assistant Professor CONDIT Classification, morphology and chemistry of citrus fruits. History

and status of citrus industry in United States and foreign countries. 5 hrs., second half-year; 3 units. Lectures, Tu Th, 11; laboratory,

Tu, 2–5. Prerequisite: course 101, completed or in progress. Lectures, written reports and laboratory work.

201. Laboratory or Field Research.

Professor COIT Topics for research in citrus or semi-tropical fruits. Open to graduate

students desiring to write theses. Throughout the year; hours to be arranged. Prerequisite: courses

101, 102, 103, and 105, or equivalent training. For further particulars, see Announcement of the Graduate Division.

DAIRY INDUSTRY

(Given at Davis) 116. Testing Dairy Products.

Mr. BAIRD. The nature and composition of milk, the various tests used in testing

different dairy products, and the practical application of them. Students who have credit for course 132 will not be given credit

for this course. 4 hrs., second half-year; 2 units. W, 8; 1-4.

127. Milk and Milk Products.

Assistant Professor Davis. The properties, care and handling of milk; principles and applications

of the Babcock tests; the construction and operation of different makes of separators; practice in the handling and churning of cream; farm cheese making. Students who have credit for courses

132, or 1 (Summer Session), will receive but 2 units credit. 5 hrs., second half-year; 3 units. M, 11; W, 9; M, 1-4.

128. Factory Methods.

Assistant Professor Davis. The principles of creamery butter-making; pasteurization, ripening

and churning of cream; handling and marketing of butter; instruc

tion and practice in making cheese. 5 hrs., second half-year; 3 units. Tu Th, 10; Th, 1-4. Prerequisite:

course 116 or 132; course 116 may be taken concurrently.

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