Woods and Dales of Derbyshire

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G. W. Jacobs & Company, 1894 - 180 strani
 

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Stran 52 - The wisdom of a learned man cometh by opportunity of leisure: and he that hath little business shall become wise.' - 'How can he get wisdom that holdeth the plough, and that glorieth in the goad; that driveth oxen; and is occupied in their labours; and whose talk is of bullocks?
Stran 47 - Those joyous hours are past away ; And many a heart, that then was gay, Within the tomb now darkly dwells, And hears no more those evening bells. And so 'twill be when I am gone ; That tuneful peal will still ring on, While other bards shall walk these...
Stran 48 - WITH deep affection And recollection I often think of Those Shandon bells, Whose sounds so wild would, In the days of childhood, Fling round my cradle Their magic spells.
Stran 44 - I was yesterday very much surprised to hear my old friend, in the midst of the service, calling out to one John Matthews to mind what he was about, and not disturb the congregation. This John Matthews, it seems, is remarkable for being an idle fellow, and at that time was kicking his heels for his diversion. This authority of the knight, though exerted in that odd manner which accompanies him in all...
Stran 44 - As Sir Roger is landlord to the whole congregation, he keeps them in very good order, and will suffer nobody to sleep in it besides himself; for if, by chance, he has been surprised into a short nap at sermon, upon recovering out of it he stands up and looks about him, and, if he sees anybody else nodding, either wakes them himself, or sends his servants to them.
Stran 83 - I would beget content," says Izaak Walton, "and increase confidence in the power and wisdom and providence of Almighty God, I will walk the meadows by some gliding stream, and there contemplate the lilies that take no care, and those very many other little living creatures that are not only created but fed, (man knows not how) by the goodness of the God of nature, and therefore trust in him.
Stran 152 - He had the art of disposing his time so well that his hours glided away in one continual round of pleasure and delight, till an unlucky minute put a period to his existence. He departed this life Nov. 14, 1802, aged 57 : wound up, in hopes of being taken in hand by his Maker ; and of being thoroughly cleaned, repaired, and set a-going in the world to come.
Stran 83 - No life, my honest scholar, no life so happy and so pleasant, as the life of a well-governed angler; for when the lawyer is swallowed up with business, and the statesman is preventing or contriving plots, then we sit on cowslip banks, hear the birds sing, and possess ourselves in as much quietness as these silent silver streams, which we now see glide so quietly by us.
Stran 84 - Nature seem'd in love : The lusty sap began to move ; Fresh juice did stir th' embracing vines, And birds had drawn their valentines, The jealous Trout, that low did lie, Rose at a well dissembled fly; There stood my friend with patient skill, Attending of his trembling quill.
Stran 84 - With the swift Pilgrim's daubed nest : The groves already did rejoice In Philomel's triumphing voice : The showers were short, the weather mild, The morning fresh, the evening smiled.

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