English Composition and Rhetoric: A Manual

Sprednja platnica
D. Appleton, 1867 - 343 strani
0 Recenzije
Mnenja niso preverjena, vendar Google preveri in odstrani lažno vsebino, ko jo prepozna.

Iz vsebine knjige

Mnenja - Napišite recenzijo

Na običajnih mestih nismo našli nobenih recenzij.

Vsebina

The Pun
45
Interrogation defined and exemplified
50
Use of Exclamation
60
CHAPTER II
66
The grammatical order frequently departed from
75
Essential pleasure of Power a rebound from Weakness
81
Examples of the failure of great efforts of genius from unsuit
86
Originality
87
Variety in a long composition
95
Resources for causing strength
101
Examples of Pathos
107
Wit defined
108
Wit combined with the Ludicrous
109
Involves the voice and the ear
110
Abrupt consonants should alternate with vowels
111
Alternation of vowel and consonant in successive words
112
Varying the letters
113
The closing syllables of a sentence
114
Variety of sound in composition generally
115
HARMONY OF SOUND AND SENSE 126 An example of the general Law of Harmony
116
Imitation of Movements
117
Bulk expressed by slowness of rhythm
119
Meanings of Taste
120
CHAPTER V
122
The Participial construction in the Period
124
The periodic form favorable to Unity
125
Balance aids the Memory
126
Extreme form of the Balance
127
Balance with Obverse Iteration
128
Keeping up the same leading term
129
The Condensed Sentence used for Comic effect
130
1 In the be ginning
131
2 After an adverbial phrase or clause
132
3 At the end
133
Unity of the Sentence
136
THE PARAGRAPH
141
Paragraph defined
142
Adversative Conjunctions
143
Phrases of reference
144
166170 Cases in which connecting words are unnecessary
145
Demonstrative Phrases of reference
146
Repetition in substance of what has been said
147
De Quincey remarkable for explicit reference
148
Third Requisite The opening sentence to indicate the subject of the Paragraph
150
Fourth Requisite Freedom from dislocation
151
Sixth Requisite A due proportion between Principal and Sub ordinate statements
152
PART II
153
First To combine with the Enumeration of the parts a Plan of the whole
154
Any feature may be chosen suggesting a comprehensive aspect Examples of the general rule
155
Second The Description may be panoramic
156
Third Description aided by Individuality
157
Fourth Description by Associated Circumstances
158
Associated human Feelings in Description
159
Description of Mind First the proper vocabulary of Mind
160
Second Feelings may be suggested by their Associations
162
PAGE
163
In Poetry What Descriptions may be undertaken by the poet
164
CHAPTER II
166
First rule To follow the Order of Events
167
A backward reference may be necessary
168
37
184
Sometimes what is recent is best to start from
169
A comprehensive scheme possible in narrative
170
Contending parties Danger of stealthy transition
171
Third Relieving the detail by Summaries
172
Art of Abridgment
173
Fourth The Explanatory Narrative
174
Interest or the gratification of the Feelings
176
40
185
Constituents of Science
186
Whenever truth is expressed generally we have Science
187
Individual facts by themselves not peculiar to science
188
Defining by Particulars
189
Delineation of Character and Criticism
199
The imparting of extended human interest to Science Plato
201
The choice of Examples and Illustrations with this view
202
The conditions of the employment of Illustrations for expository ends
203
70
205
Inferences and Applications serve to elucidate principles
207
The Expository Paragraph
208
Various forms of the Paragraph
210
78
211
CHAPTER IV
212
Oratory of the Law Courts
213
Pulpit Oratory Cultivation of the Religious Feelings
215
84
219
ability to the minds addressedHistory of the abolition of the Censorship of the press in England
220
MEANS OF PERSUASION
223
A thorough knowledge of the subject a chief requisite Re sources of language and illustration also requisite
224
89
225
Persuasion as based on Description Narration or Exposition
226
Persuasion aided by all the arts that impress ideas
228
An Argument defined
229
Deductive Arguments
230
97
231
Arguments from Analogy
233
Probable Arguments
234
Devices for stifling Arguments
236
102
237
Separating the arguments on the other side
238
Kind of Refutation called Argumentum ad hominem
240
Exposure of defective Arguments from Analogy
241
Debate often turns on opposing Probabilities
242
Tactics of Debate
243
Oratory of the FEELINGS Classes of human motives
244
First our own Pleasures and Pains considered as remote
245
Secondly Sympathy with the Pleasures and Pains of others
248
Fear Love Vanity and Pride Anger Ridicule Fine Art Emotion the Moral Senti ment
249
Management of the Feelings generally
255
The Demeanor of the Speaker
256
CHAPTER V
257
Subjects and Form peculiar to Poetry Pure and mixed kinds
259
Concreteness and Combination are characteristic of Poetry
263
Poetry
264
The Ideal is sought after
267
The Imitation of Nature imposes limitations on Poetry
269
Plot Interest
270
Painful effects should be redeemed Tragedy
271
Metreits uses
272
SPECIES OF POETRY 130 Species classified
274
1 The Song
275
2 The Ode
276
3 The Elegy
277
2 The Romance
279
5 The Metrical History
280
8 The Prose Fiction
281
Nature of the dramatic interest
282
Comedy Its various forms
283
Didactic Poetry Satiric Poetry
284
The metrical features of English poetry
285
Examples of the different Measures
286
Rhymed Verse
292
Dr Campbells allegorical comparison of Probability
299
Robert Halls Reflections on War The Sentence Pathos
308
Examples of Description from Sir Walter Scott
316
Hobbes on Laughter Sentence Paragraph Exposition
324
Drydens criticisms on Ben Jonson and Shakespeare Sen tence Paragraph Exposition
327
Expository Extract from Mr Samuel Bailey Application of Principles
330
Expository and moralizing passage from Macaulay
333
Confused chain of reasoning from Campbells Rhetoric
335
Passage from Adam Smith Exposition applied to Moral Suasion
336
Oratorical passage from Demosthenes on the Crown
338
Coleridges Mont Blanc Poetic rendering of Nature
341
Byrons Thunder Storm The Impressiveness of Action
342
Dyers Grongar Hill Poetical Description
343

Druge izdaje - Prikaži vse

Pogosti izrazi in povedi

Priljubljeni odlomki

Stran 262 - Spit, fire! spout, rain! Nor rain, wind, thunder, fire, are my daughters: I tax not you, you elements, with unkindness; I never gave you kingdom, call'd you children, You owe me no subscription: then, let fall Your horrible pleasure; here I stand, your slave, A poor, infirm, weak, and despis'd old man.
Stran 102 - In this choice of inheritance we have given to our frame of polity the image of a relation in blood; binding up the constitution of our country with our dearest domestic ties ; adopting our fundamental laws into the bosom of our family affections ; keeping inseparable, and cherishing with the warmth of all their combined and mutually reflected charities, our state, our hearths, our sepulchres, and our altars.
Stran 65 - As the waters fail from the sea, and the flood decayeth and drieth up ; so man lieth down, and riseth not : till the heavens be no more, they shall not awake, nor be raised out of their sleep.
Stran 341 - Sovran Blanc ? The Arve and Arveiron at thy base Rave ceaselessly ; but thou, most awful form ! Risest from forth thy silent sea of pines, How silently ! Around thee and above, Deep is the air, and dark, substantial, black ; An ebon mass : methinks thou piercest it As with a wedge ! But when I look...
Stran 293 - The lion would not leave her desolate, But with her went along, as a strong guard Of her chaste person, and a faithful mate Of her sad troubles and misfortunes hard ; Still, when she slept, he kept both watch and ward; And, when she waked, he waited diligent, With humble service to her will prepared : From her fair eyes he took commandement, And ever by her looks conceived her intent.
Stran 307 - It is this sense which furnishes the imagination with its ideas; so that by ' the pleasures of the imagination,' or ' fancy,' (which I shall use promiscuously) I here mean such as arise from visible objects, either when we have them actually in our view, or when we call .up their ideas into our minds by paintings, statues, descriptions, or any the like occasion.
Stran 72 - I charge you, O daughters of Jerusalem, if ye find my beloved, that ye tell him, that I am sick of love.
Stran 91 - The stars shall fade away, the sun himself Grow dim with age, and Nature sink in years, But thou shalt flourish in immortal youth, Unhurt amidst the war of elements, The wreck of matter, and the crush of worlds.
Stran 220 - We should be wary, therefore, what persecution we raise against the living labors of public men . how we spill that seasoned life of man, preserved and stored up in books; since we see a kind of homicide may be thus committed, sometimes a martyrdom...
Stran 220 - I deny not but that it is of greatest concernment in the church and commonwealth to have a vigilant eye how books demean themselves, as well as men, and thereafter to confine, imprison, and do sharpest justice on them as malefactors. For books are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are...

Bibliografski podatki