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liquids and gases; of conduction and convection; of liquefaction and solidification; of ebullition; of elastic force of vapors; theory of the steam engine; laws of vaporization and condensation; spontaneous evaporation; hygrometry; laws of specific heat; sources of heat; mechanical equivalent of heat; heat of combustion; dynamical theory of heat. Four times a week throughout the year. Professor JOHN LE CONTE.

Prescribed, Sophomore year, in the Colleges of Science.

(b) Lectures, with experimental illustrations, on Mechanics, Heat, Light, Magnetism, Electricity and Sound. Four times a week throughout the year. Associate Professor SLATE.

Prescribed during the first term, clective during the second term, Junior year, in the Classical course, the Literary course and the course in Letters and Political Science.

* II. Thermodynamics. Lectures on thermodynamics and the efficiency of heat engines, the efficiency of machines in general, and the efficiency of animal power. Twice a week during the first term. Professor JOHN LE CONTE. Open to students who have completed Course I.

* III. The Physics of Meteorology. Lectures on the distribution of heat over the earth's surface, permanency of climate, distribution of rain, winds, etc., and on optical phenomena of the atmosphere. Twice a week during the second term. Professor JoHN LE CONTE.

Open to students who have completed Course I.

* IV. Theory of Vision. Lectures on the theory of vision and the colors of natural objects in relation to the theories of light. Twice a week during the first term. Professor JOHN LE CONTE.

Open to students who have completed Course I.

V. Mathematical Physics. Treatment of selected topics that have direct bearing upon the laboratory work of Courses VIII. and IX. Twice a week during the second term. Associate Professor SLATE.

Optional to students who have completed Course I. (a).

VI. Electrical Measurements. Based on Ayrton's Practical Electricity. Exercise on text two hours, laboratory three hours a week, during the first term. Associate Professor SLATE and Mr. DREW.

Optional to students who have completed Analytic Mechanics (a) and Physics, Courses I. (a) and VIII.

VII. Physical Laboratory. Exercises connected with the subject of chemical philosophy, as pursued by students of agriculture and chemistry, such as: Vapor-density determinations by the methods of Meyer, Dumas, Hofmann; determinations of boiling point, specific heat, heat developed in chemical reactions, specific gravity; galvanic measurements connected with electrolysis. Three hours a week in the laboratory during the second term. Associate Professor SLATE, Mr. RAYMOND and Mr. Drew.

Prescribed, Junior year, in the Colleges of Agriculture and Chemistry.

*Not given in 1890-91.

VIII. Physical Laboratory: Problems. Selected physical problems, involving mathematical and experimental work, such as:

Experimental determination of the moment of inertia, and of the focal length and the curvature of lenses; measurements of galvanic resistance, and of electromotive force and intensity; determination of the modulus of elasticity, and of the coefficient of expansion by heat. Six hours a week during the second term. Associate Professor SLATE, Mr. RAYMOND and Mr. DREW. Prescribed, three hours a week, Junior year, in the Colleges of Mechanics, Mining and Civil Engineering.

IX. Physical Laboratory: Problems. A continuation of Course VIII., consisting of more advanced problems, involving accurate measurement and more extended knowledge. The scope of this work is varied and enlarged according to the capacity of the student and the time at his disposal. Nine hours a week throughout the year. Associate Professor SLATE, Mr. RAYMOND and Mr. DREW.

Prescribed, siz hours a week during one term of the Senior year, to students in the Colleges of Mechanics and Civil Engineering; open to all others who have completed Course VIII. Elective, siz hours a week, alternatively with Metallurgical Laboratory, Course IV., or Construction, Course VI., in the College of Mining during the second term of the Senior year.

Applied Physics. See also under Mechanical Engineering and Civil Engineering.

ASTRONOMY.

I. General Astronomy. General facts and principles underlying the science of astronomy, physical and spherical, with solutions of many problems, particularly those relating to the determination of latitude, longitude, time, etc. Young's General Astronomy. Three times a week during the first term. Professor SOULÉ.

Prescribed, Senior year, in the College of Civil Engineering; elective in the Classical and Literary courses and the courses in Agriculture and Chemistry.

IL Practical Astronomy and Navigation. A continuation and completion of the preceding course. Astronomy: Doolittle's Astronomy. Geodesy: Clarke's Geodesy. Navigation and Nautical Astronomy: Different methods of determining a ship's place and laying its course, including Sumner's method. Practical work in the observatory with sextant, clock, chronograph, transitand-zenith telescope. Three recitations a week during the second term, and four hours a week of practice in the observatory throughout the year. Professor SOULÉ.

Prescribed, Senior year, in the College of Civil Engineering.

Method of Least Squares. See under Mathematics.

CHEMISTRY.

I. Elementary Chemistry. Recitations and lectures, fully illustrated by experiments. Eliot and Storer's Elementary Manual and Roscoe's Elementary Chemistry (Inorganic part). Three times or four times a week for one term. Assistant Professor O'NEILL and Mr. GRAY.

This Course is intended for students beginning the subject. It is regularly given every year during the second term, and may be given in the first term if called for. A satisfactory completion of the Course entitles the student to enter the chemical laboratory. It is elective to students in the Classical course and prescribed to all other regular students who have not passed the entrance examination for advanced standing in chemistry; students in the Classical course take it in the Sophomore or Senior year; students in the Literary course, in the Sophomore year; students in the course in Letters and Political Science, any time before graduation; students in the Colleges of Science take it in the Freshman year.

II. Experimental Lectures on Inorganic Chemistry. Roscoe and Schorlemmer's Manual of Chemistry is to be read in connection with the lectures. Three times a week throughout the year, one hour being optional. Professor RISING.

Prescribed, Sophomore year, in the Colleges of Science; elective, Senior year, in the Classical and Literary courses. Students who pursue this Course take also laboratory work in qualitative analysis, from eight to twelve hours a week throughout the year. (See Course V.)

III. Chemical Philosophy. First Term: Recitations in Cooke's text-book on the subject, supplemented by notes and explanations. Second Term: Short courses of lectures on thermo-chemistry, electrolysis and spectrum analysis. Twice a week throughout the year. Professor RISING.

Prescribed, Junior year, in the College of Chemistry.

IV. Lectures on Organic Chemistry. Richter's Organische Chemie will be used as a work of reference. Twice a week throughout the year, with one hour a week extra and optional, devoted to the reading and explanation of the work of reference. Professor RISING.

Prescribed, Senior year, in the Colleges of Agriculture and Chemistry. A supplementary practical Course in connection with these lectures is given in the laboratory, embracing the preparation and examination of many of the substances mentioned in the lectures.

V. Laboratory: Qualitative Analysis. General principles of qualitative analysis, characteristic reactions and tests for bases and acids; analysis of simple and complex salts and mixtures; examination of substances in common use, or of domestic importance, for impurities or adulterations. Special attention will also be given to the general relations of the elements, and to synthetic preparations. Eight hours a week during the first term; twelve during the second term. Assistant Professor O'NEILL and Mr. GRAY, assisted by Mr. WRIGHT.

Prescribed in the Colleges of Science; but students in the College of Agriculture take nine hours a week throughout the year.

VI. Laboratory: Quantitative Analysis. Gravimetric and volumetric analysis of ores, minerals, etc.; practice in the preparation of organic and inorganic compounds; organic analysis; special investigations; methods of

analysis. From twelve to eighteen hours a week, for from two to four terms. Professor RISING and Assistant Professor O'NEILL, assisted by Mr. WRIGHT.

Prescribed to students pursuing Agriculture and Metallurgy, with a schedule value of four hours a week; and to students in the College of Chemistry, with a schedule value of six hours a week.

VII. Physiological Chemistry. A course of lectures embracing a general consideration of organisms; relation to external conditions, atmospheric pressure, etc.; inorganic and organic constituents of organisms; chemistry of animal tissues and fluids; physiological functions and processes, digestion, nutrition, excretion, respiration, etc. Laboratory practice in the preparation of physiological products; test for blood and bile constituents; urine analysis; milk analysis. Works of reference: Gamgee's Chemistry of Animal Functions, Hoppe-Seyler's Physiologische Chemie. Three times a week during the second term. Assistant Professor O'NEILL.

Elective, Senior year, to students in the Colleges of Chemistry and Agriculture. Open to other students who have completed Course I.

VIII. Blowpipe Analysis: Qualitative. Cornwall's or Landauer's Blowpipe Analysis. Laboratory practice. Two exercises a week, of two hours each, during the first term. Mr. GRAY, assisted by Mr. WRIGHT.

This course is supplementary to Course V., and is prescribed, Sophomore year, in the Colleges of Mechanics, Mining, Civil Engineering and Chemistry.

IX. Blowpipe Analysis: Quantitative. Two hours a week during the second term. Professor RISING.

Open to students who have completed Course VIII.

X. Modern Theories in Chemistry. Ostwald's Allgemeine Chemie in connection with Lothar Meyer's Moderne Chemie. Twice a week throughout the year. Professor RISING.

Open to students who have completed Courses I., II., III. and IV.

Agricultural Chemistry. See Course I. under Agriculture and Entomology.

Assaying. See Course III. under Mining, Metallurgy and Assaying.

BOTANY.

1. Vegetal Structure and Morphology. Lectures, illustrated as fully as possible by living specimens, and recitations from Bastin's Elements of Botany. Three times a week during the first term. Assistant Professor GREENE.

Prescribed, Sophomore year, in the Colleges of Agriculture and Chemistry; elective, Sophomore year, in the course in Letters and Political Science; elective in the Junior and Senior years, in the Classical and Literary courses and the course in Letters and Political Science.

II. Systematic and Economic Botany. Practical exercises in the determination of genera and species of the California flora; lectures on plants of

commercial value, and on those useful or injurious to agriculture in California. Greene's Handbook of the Botany of Middle California and Gray's Synoptical Flora of North America. Three times a week during the second term. Assistant. Professor GREENE.

Prescribed, Sophomore year, in the College of Agriculture; elective, Sophomore year, in the course in Letters and Political Science and in the College of Chemistry; elective, Junior and Senior years, in the Classical and Literary courses and the course in Letters and Political Science.

III. Advanced Systematic Botany. Special studies in the different phanerogamic natural orders, involving the determination and classification of specimens. Three times a week throughout the year. Assistant Professor GREENE. Optional to students who have completed Courses I. and II.

ZOOLOGY.

I. Comparative Zoology. Lectures. The Course is essentially one of comparative physiology. First term: Organs and functions of animal life, i. e., nervous systems, sense organs, muscular and skeleton systems. Second term: Organs and functions of vegetative life, i. e., digestive, circulatory, respiratory and excretory systems. Twice a week throughout the year. Professor Joseph LE CONTE.

Prescribed, Junior year, in the Colleges of Agriculture, Mechanics, Civil Engineering and Chemistry; elective in the College of Letters.

II. Biological Laboratory. In connection with the work in comparative zoology and in continuation of this work, students who desire to pursue the subject by laboratory work in biology are encouraged to do so, the necessary microscopes and work-room being furnished to them. The work is under the general supervision of the professor in charge of the course in Comparative Zoology. The books recommended are Huxley and Martin's Practical Biology, and Rolleston's Forms of Animal Life. Professor JOSEPH LE Conte.

Entomology. See Course II. under Agriculture and Entomology.

GEOLOGY.

I. Geology. First term: Dynamical and structural geology. Second term: Historical geology. Three times a week throughout the year. Professor JOSEPH LE CONTE.

Prescribed, Senior year, in the Colleges of Science; elective in the College of Letters.

II. Field Geology. An inquiry by the student into the geological conditions which obtain in the region around the bay of San Francisco, with occasional more extended excursions to points of especial interest. The Course is designed to cultivate habits and proper methods of field observation, and to train the student in the judicious interpretation, both of single observations

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