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their turn serve as a means for discussing such subjects as strength of materials and hydraulics. A similar sequence is observed with other studies; thus descriptive geometry is connected with work in the drawing-room, surveying with extensive field practice and the mapping of surveys actually made by the student, physics with physical problems and work in the physical laboratory, strength of materials and hydraulics with original designs in the drawingroom, followed by working tests in the mechanical laboratory. These important studies extend through the whole four years' course; and inasmuch as they are peculiarly interdependent, it is necessary that they should be completed in the prescribed order, otherwise the student will find himself seriously embarrassed in his work.

The studies in chemistry and allied branches begin with general experimental chemistry, inorganic and organic, followed by analytical chemistry as an application, viz.: qualitative, quantitative and blow pipe analysis, subjects indispensable to subsequent work in metallurgy and assaying.

Having acquired a working power in chemistry, the student begins the study of mineralogy; this is followed by petrography, and by courses in general and field geology. These studies are developed with special reference to their applications in mining. The tine collections, laboratory appliances, and opportunities for field work which the University is now prepared to offer, render these courses particularly attractive not only to mining students, but to those who wish to make a specialty of geological work.

The technical branches of mining, metallurgy and assaying, peculiar to this College, are begun in the Junior year, when the student has had sufficient training in the general and preparatory branches to study them with profit.

The instruction in mining and metallurgy is illustrated throughout by maps, plans, drawings and sketches of mines, furnaces, etc., together with actual working results whenever possible. The illustrations and references are drawn, as far as possible, from typical mines and reduction works in operation in California, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, etc., so that the vacation trips of the student may be made more directly useful to him. In order that the student may have a ready means of following up any subject for himself, constant reference is made for details to the best technical literature, standard and current, in English, French, and German.

In the Course in metallurgy, after the general consideration of the subjects which concern the treatment of all the metals, the rest of the undergraduate work is devoted to a detailed study of all the important methods in use for the reduction of the ores of lead, silver, gold, copper, and quicksilver. These have been selected as the metals most intimately connected with California industries; the other metals have been reserved for graduate study, for the reason given under the head of lectures on metallurgy, Special Part, page 66, above.

In assaying each method is explained by lecture, following which the student is required to carry out the method in the laboratory, and to obtain accurate results before another is treated. Since the wet methods are taught in the quantitative chemical laboratory, most attention is paid to fire assays. Students are advised to spend their vacation throughout the course in examining typical mines and smelting works in various parts of the State.

For details concerning laboratory facilities in assaying, metallurgy, chemistry, mineralogy, physics, and mechanics, see pages 76-80.

For details concerning the subjects taught in the course, the reader is referred to the following outline:

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Outline of Studies. English (two terms), II., III., IV.

Eight themes the first year, six the second, and four the third. French (four terms), I., or German (four terms), I.

.

Mathematics (four terms), III., IV., V(6), VIII., IX.
Surveying (one term), I.
Field Practice (two terms), III.
Physics (two terms), 1.
Physical Laboratory (two terms), V., VI.
Analytic Mechanics (two terms), l(a).
Elementary Drawing (two terms), I.
Instrumental Drawing and Descriptive Geometry (two terms), II.
Mechanical Drawing (one term), IV.
Graphostatics (one term), V.
Strength of Materials (one term), V.
Hydrodynamics (one term), II.
Construction (two terms), V1.

Chemistry (three terms), I., II.
Qualitative Analysis (two terms), V.
Blow pipe Analysis (one term), VIII.
Quantitative Analysis (two terms), VI.
Mineralogy (four terms), I., II.
Petrography (two terms), III., IV.
Geology (two terms), I.
Field Geology (two terms), II.

Mining (two terms), I.
Metallurgy (two terms), II.
Assaying (two terms), III.
Metallurgical Laboratory (one term), IV.

The course concludes with a written thesis on some subject connected with mining or metallurgy, and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science.

Special Students. Students of mature years having the necessary preparation to follow such courses with advantage may concentrate their entire attention on mining, metallurgy, or assaying, with the subjects directly related.

To derive any real benefit from such courses, the student should be prepared to carry on the work for at least one year, and if possible two or more. Such students should be prepared to enter at the beginning of the academic year, August 15, 1892, as all the courses begin at that time, and it would be usually impossible to enter later without being at a disadvantage.

The regular undergraduate course is advised in all cases in preference to any other. Where through lack of time this is impossible the special course should approximate to it as much as possible.

GRADUATE COURSES.

Students desiring to pursue advanced or special work after graduation, will be afforded every facility that the libraries, laboratories, and collections of the University offer.

Candidates for the professional degrees in this College must satisfy the following conditions:

To obtain the degree of MINING ENGINEER, the candidate must be a graduate of the College of Mining of this University or give evidence satisfactory to its Faculty of having successfully pursued a course of study equivalent to its regular undergraduate course. He must also pass a satisfactory examination in the following subjects: Mining, ore dressing, petrography, economic geology, thermodynamics (elements), drawing and construction of mining machinery, blowpipe assaying, and political economy. He must have had at least one year of actual practice in the field in the course chosen, and must show, by an original memoir upon some subject bearing upon this profession, his power to apply his knowledge to practice. This degree will not be given earlier than three years after graduation.

A candidate for the degree of METALLURGICAL ENGINEER must pass an examination in the following subjects: Metallurgy, ore dressing, assaying and analysis, blowpipe assaying, thermodynamics (elements), drawing and construction of furnaces and metallurgical machinery, and political economy. In all other respects the conditions are the same as those required for the degree of Mining Engineer.

STUDENTS.

NAME.

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STATUS, George Deroy Blood

.I. Peter Browning...

IV. James Franklin Carpenter. Special. William Morris Carpenter At Large. William Dudley Chapman.At Large. Roy Hughes Clarke..

III. Enric Desehi Desi

Special. Mario Escobar....

-Special. James Constantyn Helenus Fergu

-Special. Francis Gordon Graham. -Special. Louis Ebenezer Gooding. Special. William Edward Hall, Jr. ......IV. George Jacob Hoffmann.

IV. James Herbert Kervin.. Special. William Henry Linney

NAME.

STATUS.
Eddy John Morgan. Limited.
Edward Olney--

-.III.
William Edmund Patterson. Special.
Frederick Stanton Pheby
Thomas Bailey Pheby, Jr. At Large.
Juan de la Cruz Posada -Special.
Francis Arthur Rich Special.
Walter Benjamin Rountree...-..IV.
George Oliver Schacker.... III.
Edwin Slater Shanklin At Large.
Ernest Henry Simonds..

II.
Leslie Simson..

.I. George Frederick Stone..

I. William Whitman Symmes.

At Large. Enrique Uribe.

Special. Charles Albert Weck - At Large.

..1 Ꮩ. William Luebbert..

I. Total

32.

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COLLEGE OF CIVIL ENGINEERING.

FACULTY: The Faculty of each College consists of the President of the University and the resident Professors, Associate Professors, and Assistant Professors giving instruction in the College.

Professor KELLOGG, PRESIDENT pro tempore; Professor STRINGHAM, DEAN; Professors HESSE, PUTZKER, RANDOLPH, RISING, Slate, SOULÉ; Associate Professors BRADLEY, EDWARDS, PAGET; Assistant Professors HASKELL, KOWER, LANGE, LAWSON, SENGER.

THE UNDERGRADUATE COURSE.

The requirements for admission are given on page 32.

The work in the first two years of the undergraduate course is designed to furnish a thorough training in the fundamental principles of the mathematical and modern physical sciences and in English, and to afford the student the opportunity to acquire a reading knowledge of French or German.

The work in the third and fourth years of the course is devoted mainly to the special engineering subjects, surveying, field practice with all the instruments in common use, strength of materials, engineering structures and astronomy. For details concerning the subject-matter and methods of instruction in these special branches, see pages 64–65.

A valuable collection of surveying instruments, including rods, steel tapes, chains, hand and Y levels, theodolites, transits, solar and surveyors' compasses, plane tables, etc., is in the possession of the department. There is an excellent assortment of models in wood of the various bonds of masonry, and of different walls, arches, gateways; of joints and fastenings in carpentry; and of bridge and roof trusses. Diagrams of various European and American engineering structures, and the hypsometrical and surveying apparatus formerly belonging to the California Geological Survey, are in the collection.

The following outline indicates briefly the scope of the four years' course. Further details concerning the subjects mentioned will be found in the descriptions of the several courses of instruction, beginning on page 38.

Outline of Studies.

English (two terms), II., III., IV.

Eight Themes the first year, six the second, and four the third. French (four terms), I., II., or German (four terms), I. [French is recommended.]

Mathematics (four terms), III., IV., V(6), VIII., IX., XV.
Physics (two terms), I.

Physical Laboratory (two terms), V., VI.
Astronomy, Geodesy, Navigation and Nautical Astronomy (two terms), I., II.
Surveying (one term), I.
Roads, Railroads and Canals (one term), II.
Field Practice and Mapping (two terms), III.
Elements of Industrial Drawing (two terms), 1.
Instrumental Drawing and Descriptive Geometry (two terms), II.
Topographic Drawing (two terms), III.
Graphostatics (one term), V.
Analytic Mechanics (two terms), I(a).
Hydrodynamics (one term), II.
Construction (two terms), VI.
Sanitary Engineering (one term), IV.
Strength of Materials (one term), V.
Engineering Structures (one term), VI.
Engineering Specifications and Contracts (one term, optional), VII.

Chemistry (three terms), I., II.
Qualitative Analysis (two terms), V.
Blowpipe Analysis (one term), VIII.
Zoology (two terms), I.
Geology (two terms), l.

The course concludes with a problem or investigation in some engineering subject, and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science.

GRADUATE COURSES. To graduate students are extended the abundant facilities for advanced or special work which the libraries, laboratories, and collections of the University afford.

The degree of Civil ENGINEER is conferred under the following conditions:

The candidate must be a graduate of the College of Civil Engineering of this University, or he must give evidence satisfactory to its Faculty of having successfully pursued a course of study equivalent to its regular undergraduate course.

He must pass a satisfactory examination in the following subjects: Railway construction, principles of equipment and administration, railway tunnels, foundations in dry and wet soils or under water, principles of construction of walls, arches, domes, etc., standard authors upon river and harbor engineering, practical astronomy, drawing and designing of engineering structures, history (elective alternatively with English), political economy (elective alternatively with English).

He must have practiced his profession for not less than one year, and he must present an acceptable original memoir on some professional subject. This degree will not be given earlier than three years after graduation.

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