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Junior Year. FIRST TERM.

Prescribed: Themes, German (2 hrs.) or French (2 hrs.), Quantitative Analysis (12 hrs.), Zoology (2 hrs.), Mineralogy (2 hrs.), Surveying (2 hrs.), Field Practice (6 hrs.), Agricultural Chemistry (3 hrs.), Entomology (1 hr.), Military Science (2 hrs.).

SECOND TERM.

Prescribed : Political Economy (4 hrs.), Themes, German (2 hrs.) or French (2 hrs.), Physical Laboratory (3 hrs.), Quantitative Analysis (12 hrs.), Zoology (2 hrs.), Mineralogy (2 hrs.), Agricultural Chemistry (3 hrs.), Entomology (1 hr.), Military Science (2 hrs.).

Senior Year. FIRST TERM.

Prescribed : Economic History (4 hrs.), Organic Chemistry (2 hrs.), Quantitatire Analysis (13 hrs.), History and Political Science (4 hrs.) or * Astronomy (3 hrs.), Geology (2 hrs.), Mineralogical Laboratory (4 hrs.), Agriculture and Horticulture (3 hrs.), Parasitic Plant Diseases (2 hrs.), Military Science (1 hr.).

*

SECOND TERM.

Prescribed : Organic Chemistry (2 hrs.), Quantitative Analysis ( 12 hrs.), Hislory and Political Science (4 hrs.) or * Physiological Chemistry (3 hrs.), Geology (2 hrs.), Mineralogical Laboratory (4 hrs.), Agriculture and Horticulture (3 hrs.), Military Science (1 hr.), Thesis.

The course leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science.

Special Students. Students in Agriculture not desiring to take the full course, nor to receive a diploma, may be admitted to special or limited courses for a longer or shorter period, and may attend only special lectures, recitations ar.d practical exercises, according to their requirements, so long as they maintain a gond standing in their studies and general conduct.

STUDENTS.

STATUS.

XAXE.
Annie Montague Alexander..Special.
Frank Watts Bancroft.....At Large.
Frederick Theodore Bioletti..Special.
Charles Arthur Colemore III.
Henry Devens, Jr... Special.

Total

NAME.

STATUS. Harriett Bertha Perkins.. -Special. Richard Schmidt ...-.. Special. Arnold Valentine Stubenrauch...

Special. Edwin Cooper Van Dyke.. At Large.

.9.

• Either Astronomy or Physiological Chemistry must be taken during the Senior year.

COLLEGE OF MECHANICS.

FACULTY. The Faculty of each College consists of the President of the University and the resident Professors, Associate Professors, and Assistant Professors giving instruction in the College.

Professor KELLOGG, PRESIDENT pro tempore; Professor STRINGHAM, DEAN; Professors HESSE, PUTZKER, RANDOLPH, RISING, SLATE, SOULÉ; Associate Professors BRADLEY, EDWARDS, Paget; Assistant Professors HASKELL, KOWER, LANGE, LAWSON, SENGER.

THE UNDERGRADUATE COURSE.

The requirements for admission are specified on page 32.

A summary of the subjects embraced in the undergraduate course of this College is given below. The work is distributed into three general groups of studies. each group having a connected sequence. The second group represents the major part of the work of the course, and to the mastery of these subjects it is expected that the student will devote his best efforts. The course extends through four years.

Outline of Studies.

English (two terms), II., III., IV.

Eight Themes the first.year, six the second, and four the third. German (six terms), I., III., or French (six terms), I., II., III. [German is recommended.]

Mathematics (six terms), III., IV., V. (b), VIII., IX., XIII., XV.
Physics (two terms), I.
Physical Laboratory (two terms), V. and VI.
Elementary Drawing (two terms), I.
Instrumental Drawing and Descriptive Geometry (two terms), II.
Mechanical Drawing (two terms), IV.
Graphostatics (one term), V.
Construction (two terms), VI.
Analytic Mechanics (two terms), I.
Strength of Materials (one term), V.
Hydrodynamics (one term), II.
Hydraulics and Hydraulic Motors (one term), III.
Kinematics (two terms), IV.
Thermodynamics (two terms), V.
Machine Construction (one term), VI.
Mechanical Laboratory (three terms), VII.

Chemistry (three terms), I., II.
Qualitative Analysis (two terms), V.
Blowpipe Analysis (one term), VIII.
Zoology (two terms), I.
Geology (two terms), 1.

The course concludes with a written thesis on some subject connected with mechanical engineering, and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science.

For details concerning the nature and scope of the instruction in the various subjects embraced in the course, the reader is referred to the statements made under the descriptions of the several courses of instruction, beginning on page 38.

GRADUATE COURSE. The libraries, laboratories, and collections of the University are at the service of students desiring to pursue advanced or special work after graduation.

For the professional degree in this College the following conditions must be complied with:

A candidate for the degree of MECHANICAL ENGINEER must be a graduate of the College of Mechanics of this University, or he must give evidence satisfactory to its Faculty of having successfully completed an amount of work equivalent to that of its regular undergraduate course; and he must pass a satisfactory examination in the following studies: Thermodynamics, construction of hydraulic motors and heat engines, theory of electric motors, machine construction, general machine design. He must also have engaged for at least one year in professional work in addition to the time spent in the graduate course; and he must present an acceptable original memoir on some professional subject. This degree will not be given earlier than three years after graduation.

LABORATORY PRACTICE. The Mechanical Laboratory is designed to offer facilities for tests and experimental inquiry, such as (1) submitting to actual test, and verifying directly, principles developed in the lecture-room; (2) building and testing machines designed by the students; (3) investigating such subjects and engineering problems as are not only calculated to impart training in methods of investigation, but the results of which may prove of value to the engineering public at large; (4) ascertaining the character and proper treatment of materials, and acquiring familiarity with the appliances and processes necessary to the construction of designs.

If the student desires to acquire skill in the use of tools, opportunity is offered to him for practice, under the instruction of an able mechanician, (1) in the working of metal and the use of tools, to give him an insight into the most practical methods of manipulating given machines; (2) in wood turning, planing, and carpenter work; (3) in molding and pattern-making; (4) in steamfitting, such as cutting and threading pipes, etc.; (5) in forging and tempering tools.

After he has become sufficiently acquainted with the working of wood and metals, and is able to recognize the difference in machines, tools, and methods of founding and blacksmithing, he is shown through manufacturing establishments, so selected as to enable him to see on a large scale those operations and methods with which he has become familiar only on a small one.

For descriptions of the mechanical and other laboratories, the reader is referred to pages 76-81.

STUDENTS.

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NAME.

STATUS, Milo Samuel Baker -At Large. Caroline Willard Baldwin.At Large. Eugene Henry Barker.

At Large. John Peter Cook....

...III. Harvey Wiley Corbett.

.At Large. Frank Clark Deacon..

..II. William Joseph Drew.. At Large. Henry Stevens Dutton.

III. Ernest Ingalls Dyer .At Large. Stanly Alexander Easton..At Large. Charles James Fox, Jr.

IV. Edward Howard French... ...IV. Egbert James Gates At Large. Ray Edson Gilson.

III. James Huntington Gray ... At Large. Olcott Haskell.

IV. Total

George Jackson Henry, Jr.. At Large.
Ross Browne Hoffmann ....1Ꮩ.
Herbert Henry Lang Limited.
Louis Tunis Merwin... At Large.
Julia Morgan...

At Large.
Lloyd Nelson Peart.. At Large.
Emily Helen Richardson.... Special.
Edgar Rickard...

IV. Charles Elbert Sedgwick... II. James Uriel Smith.....

III. William Gladstone Spiers. IV. John Ernest Strachan...

IV. Douglass Waterman......

At Large. Benjamin Franklin Woolner.....

Limited.

.30.

COLLEGE OF MINING.

The College of Mining is designed for students who wish to become mining or metallurgical engineers, or to engage in one of the many pursuits connected with the mining industry, such as the surveying and mapping of mines, the assaying and working of ores, the designing and use of mining machinery, or the exploitation of mines.

FACULTY.

The Faculty of each College consists of the President of the University and the resident Professors, Associate Professors, and Assistant Professors giving instruction in the College.

Professor KELLOGG, PRESIDENT pro tempore; Professor STRINGHAM, DEAN; Professors CHRISTY, HESSE, PUTZKER, RANDOLPH, Rising, SLATE, SOULÉ; Associate Professors BRADLEY, EDWARDS, PAGET; Assistant Professors HasKELL, KOWER, LANGE, Lawson, O'NEILL, SENGER.

THE UNDERGRADUATE COURSE.

The requirements for admission are specified on page 32.

The undergraduate course may be completed by the average student in four years.

During the first two years considerable time is devoted to language studies, embracing English prose style, the preparation of summaries and theme writing, and to the acquisition of a reading knowledge of either French or German.

Owing to the large and valuable scientific and technical literatures of these languages, it is important to the advanced student to be able to read them both. Only one is required of undergraduates, but both may be mastered during the course by a little extra effort. Those who have already a reading knowledge of either of these languages are advised to elect the other in College.

A knowledge of Spanish, while not required, will be of considerable advantage to mining students, as they will find many professional opportunities in Spanish-American countries. It may be easily acquired during the course.

Preliminary to the strictly technical studies of the course, the student receives a sufficient training in those branches of modern physical science which

a lie at the basis of all the industries connected with mining: on the one hand, mathematics and its applications; and on the other, chemistry, mineralogy, petrography, and geology.

The mathematical studies are pursued with special reference to subsequent practical applications in surveying, physics, and analytic mechanics, which in

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