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Fifty units of the Prescribed Studies named above must be completed during the first two years. Twelve units-six of a modern language and six of natural sciences-may be taken as late as the third year.

The choice of Group Electives may be announced at the beginning of any term after sixty units of work have been satisfactorily completed, but not later than the beginning of the Senior year. A statement of the courses permissible for Group Electives is made from year to year in the Announcement of Courses of Instruction.

The thirty units of Free Electives may be chosen at any period during the undergraduate course.

Regular students are required to take at least fifteen units a term during the first three years, and are required to complete ninety-three units in order to attain Senior standing. Seniors will not be required to take more than twelve units a term, if that minimum will complete the requirement for graduation.

In addition to these studies, able-bodied male students are required to take the exercises in Physical Culture during the first two years of residence.

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SCIENCES.

FACULTY.

President KELLOGG; Professor STRINGHAM, Dean; Professors BRADLEY, BROWN, CLAPP, GAYLEY, GREENE, HILGARD, Howison, JONES, LE CONTE, MERRILL, MOSES, PAGET, PUTZKER, Rising, SLATE, SOULE, VOORSANGER, WINN; Associate Professors ARDLEY, Bacon, EDWARDS, FLAGG, HASKELL, Lawson, RICHARDSON, WHITING, WICKSON; Assistant Professors BAILEY, JOHNSON, LANGE, LEUSCHNER, PLEHN, SENGER, WOODWORTH.

UNDERGRADUATE COURSE.

The requirements for admission to this college are: (1) English, (3) Algebra, (4) Geometry, (5) Government of the United States, (6) and (7) Latin, (11) Physics, (14) English or (15) French or German; and either (10) and (13) History, or (12) two of the following: (a) Advanced Mathematics, (b) Chemistry, (c) Botany, (d) Zoology.

Until May, 1896, applicants will be admitted to the College of Social Sciences, for the degree of Ph.B., upon complying with the requirements outlined in Group IV, on p. 41.

The undergraduate instruction in this college is designed to furnish a liberal education without Greek, and to afford opportunity for literary, linguistic, historical, and economic studies, as well as preparation for the professional school. For details regarding the studies pursued, consult the statements made under the several courses of instruction in this Register and in the Annual Announcement.

The requirements for the degree of B.L. (or Ph.B.) consist of one hundred and twenty-five units,* distributed as follows:

A. Prescribed Studies.-Sixty-five units, as distributed in the following scheme:

English, 10 units-Course 1 (a) and (b).

Latin, French, German, History, 28 units-not less than two nor more than three of these subjects, the courses in them to be chosen in proper sequence from the announced lists; but the French or German, if chosen, must be pursued two years, unless advanced standing be attained.

Mathematics, 10 units-s0 chosen from Courses 1-8 as to include either Course 1 (a), or Course 1 (6), or Course 8; and Course 2, or Courses 4 and 5; and, if the student has not passed the entrance examination in Solid Geometry, Course 6.

Natural Sciences, 12 units-chosen from the general list exclusive of Chemistry 1.

Military Science, 5 units-Courses 1 and 2. Students excused from the exercises in Military Science are required to make up the deficiency in hours in other departments of study.

B. Group Electives.—Thirty units of advanced studies in one subject, or not more than two cognate subjects, chosen from one of the following groups:

1. Philosophy: either alone or together with one subject from Group 2, 3,

or 4.

2. Economics and Politics (including History and Law).

3. The Greek, Latin, French, Spanish, Italian, German, and English languages and literatures, or any other languages and literatures that may at any time be announced among the courses of instruction; Comparative Philology, Archäology, Art, etc.

4. Pedagogy, together with one subject from Group 1, 2, or 3.

C. Free Electives.-Thirty units, chosen from the entire list of courses, subject, however, to any sequence of studies required and announced by any department.

Fifty units of the Prescribed Studies mentioned above must be completed during the first two years; twelve units of the Natural Sciences may be taken as late as the third year.

The choice of Group Electives may be announced at the beginning of any term after sixty units of work have been satisfactorily completed, but not later than the beginning of the Senior year. A statement of the courses permissible for Group Electives is made from year to year in the Announcement of Courses of Instruction.

The thirty units of Free Electives may be chosen at any period during the undergraduate course.

Regular students are required to take at least fifteen units a term during the first three years, and are required to complete ninety-three units in order to attain Senior standing. Seniors will not be required to take more than twelve units a term, if that minimum will complete the requirement for graduation.

In addition to these studies, able-bodied male students are required to take the exercises in Physical Culture during the first two years of residence.

*A unit is a credit for one hour of work per week for one term.

COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES.

FACULTY.

President KELLOGG; Professor STRINGHAM, Dean; Professors BRADLEY, Brown, CLAPP, GAYLEY, GREENE, HILGARD, Howison, LE CONTE, MERRILL, Moses, PAGET, PUTZKER, RIBING, SLATE, SOULÉ, WINN; Associate Professors ARDLEY, Bacon, EDWARDS, FLAGG, HASKELL, LAWSON, RICHARDSON, WHITING, WICKSON; Assistant Professors BAILEY, JOHNSON, LANGE, LEUSCHNER, LOUGHRIDGE, O'NEILL, PLEIN, SENGER, WOODWORTH.

UNDERGRADUATE COURSE.

The requirements for admission to the college are: (1) English, (3) Algebra, (4) Geometry, (5) Government of the United States, (6) and (7) Latin [or, until May, 1899, (15a) French and (156) German]; (11) Physics; (14) English, or (15a) French or (156) German-unless these last have been offered in lieu of (6) and (7); and either (10) and (13) History, or two of the subdivisions of (12), namely, (a) Advanced Mathematics, (6) Chemistry, (c) Botany, (d) Zoology.

The special feature in the curriculum of this college is the prominence given to the Natural Sciences as elements of culture, and the preparation afforded for a professional career in Science. For details regarding the studies pursued, consult the statements made under the several courses of instruction in this Register and in the Annual Announcement.

The requirements for the degree of B.S. consist of one hundred and twentyfive units,* distributed as follows:

A. Prescribed Studies.-Sixty-five units, as distributed in the following scheme:

Natural Sciences, 26 units-chosen from the general list, exclusive of Chemistry 1.

English, 10 units--Course 1 (a) and (b).

French or German, 14 units-Courses 1, 2, and 3 in French, or Courses 1 and 2 in German.

Mathematics, 10 unitsso chosen from Courses 1-8 as to include either Course 1 (a), or Course 1(6), or Course 8; and Course 2, or Courses 4 and 5; and, if the student has not passed the entrance examination in Solid Geometry, Course

Military Science, 5 units-Courses 1 and 2. Students excused from the exercises in Military Science are required to make up the deficiency in hours in other departments of study.

B. Group Electives.-Thirty units of advanced studies in one subject, or not more than two cognate subjects, chosen from one of the following groups :

1. Philosophy: either alone or together with one subject from Group 2, 3, or 4.

2. Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Astronomy.
* A unit is a credit for one hour of work per week for one term.

3. Physics, Chemistry, Geology (including Paleontology, Mineralogy, Petrography), the Biological Sciences (including Botany and Zoology).

4. Pedagogy, together with one subject from Group 1, 2, or 3.

C. Free Electives.-Thirty units, chosen from the entire list of courses, subject, however, to any sequence of studies required and announced by any department.

Fifty units of the Prescribed Studies named above must be completed during the first two years; twelve units of the Natural Sciences may be taken as late as the third year.

The choice of Group Electives may be announced at the beginning of any term after sixty units of work have been satisfactorily completed, but not later than the beginning of the Senior year. A statement of the courses permissible for Group Electives is made from year to year in the Announcement of Courses of Instruction.

The thirty units of Free Electives may be chosen at any period during the undergraduate course.

Regular students are required to take at least fifteen units a term during the first three years, and are required to complete ninety-three units in order to attain Senior standing. Seniors will not be required to take more than twelve units a term, if that minimum will complete the requirement for graduation.

In addition to these studies, able-bodied male students are required to take the exercises in Physical Culture during the first two years of residence.

CURRICULA OF THE COLLEGES OF APPLIED

SCIENCE

The Colleges of Applied Science are the following:

The College of Agriculture.
The College of Mechanics.
The College of Mining.
The College of Civil Engineering.

The College of Chemistry. During the year 1893–4 an important reorganization of the courses in the Colleges of Mechanics, Mining, and Civil Engineering was accomplished. The entrance requirements were increased (see p. 41). The special features of the present curricula are as follows: First, a minimum four-year course of fifteen units per week, exclusive of Physical Culture and Military Exercises, has been provided. Including the time given to preparation of studies, this course requires of the student an average of forty-five hours per week. In this minimum course only such studies are included as are essential to professional training. Secondly, but few studies are pursued at the same timer and they are as nearly as possible interdependent. Thirdly, the relation of practical application to theory is emphasized. Instruction is from the beginning illustrated by exercises in the laboratory, the drawing-room, and the field. Fourthly, an effort is made to utilize the vacations of students for further application of their knowledge in the direction of future professional pursuits. For this purpose summer schools in Surveying, Practical Mining, Mechanical Practice, and Astronomy have been organized. Lastly, in addition to the minimum of fifteen units per week, students without conditions are allowed to elect four units per week from any of the courses given in the University for which they have the necessary preparation. In general, students are advised to choose these additional units of study from courses in Modern Language and Literature, History and Political Economy. But they may, if they so desire, pursue special lines of technical study in Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Geology, Mineralogy, Petrography, Mechanics, Surveying, Electricity, Mining, and Metallurgy, in addition to the minimum requirements prescribed in the respective colleges.

In the Colleges of Agriculture and Chemistry, the curricula were, during the year 1893-4, reorganized upon a basis somewhat similar to that of the Colleges of Liberal Culture, but Prescribed Studies are determined with a view to the technical as well as the general training of the student, and Group or Cognate Electives include in proper proportion advanced courses characteristic of the college. In the College of Chemistry, about one half of the course is prescribed; one quarter of the course consists of Free Electives, and one quarter of Group Electives, but the greater part of the Group Elective must be in

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