Bulletin of the American Geographical Society, Količina 35

Sprednja platnica
American Geographical Society, 1903
 

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Priljubljeni odlomki

Stran 522 - The two following marches were made in a thick fog, through which we groped our way northward over broken ice and across gigantic, wave-like drifts of hard snow. One more march in clear weather over frightful going, consisting of fragments of old floes, ridges of heavy ice thrown up to heights of 25 to 50 feet, crevasses and holes masked by snow, the whole intersected by narrow leads of open water...
Stran 511 - The moon had left us entirely now7, and the. ice foot was utterly impracticable, and we groped and stumbled through the rugged sea ice as far as Cape Baird. Here we slept a few hours in a burrow in the snow, then started across Lady Franklin Bay. In complete darkness and over a chaos of broken and heaved-up ice we stumbled and fell and groped for eighteen hours, till we climbed upon the ice foot of the north side. Here a dog was killed for food.
Stran 120 - All the younger miambers of society are early trained to show the utmost deference to age. They must never come into the presence of aged persons or pass by their dwellings without taking off their hats and assuming a crouching gait. When seated in their presence, it must — always be at a 'respectful distance' — a distance proportioned to the difference in their ages and position in society. If they come near enough to hand an aged man a lighted pipe or a glass of water, the bearer must always...
Stran 519 - Still further stiffened by the continuous low temperature of the previous night, the main sheet of new ice in front of the cliffs was not hazardous as long as the sledges kept a few hundred feet apart, did not stop, and their drivers kept some yards away to one side. Beyond the limit of my previous day's reconnoissance there were areas of much younger ice, which caused me considerable apprehension, as it buckled to a very disquieting extent beneath dogs and sledges, and from the motion of the outside...
Stran 522 - A careful reconnoissance of the pack to the northward, with glasses, from an elevation of a few hundred feet, showed the ice to be of a less impracticable character than it was north of Cape Washington. What were evidently water clouds showed very distinctly on the horizon. This water sky had been apparent ever since we left Cape Washington, and at one time assumed such a shape that I was almost deceived into taking it for land. Continued careful observation destroyed the illusion. My obversations...
Stran 122 - Ombwiri ' is not known. As it is used in the plural as well as in the singular form, it no doubt represents a class or family of spirits. He is regarded as a tutelar or guardian spirit. Almost every man has his "own "ombwiri, for which he provides a small house near "Ms 'own.
Stran 526 - ... by pressure of the outside pack. It promised at best the heaviest kind of work, with the certainty that it would run abroad at the first release of pressure. The next day, when about one-third the way across, the ice did begin to open out, and it was only after a rapid and hazardous dash from cake to cake that we reached an old floe, which after several hours of heavy work allowed us to climb upon the ice-foot of the western end of the cliffs. From here on rapid progress was made again, three...
Stran 518 - Hecla route and failed of my utmost aims the result would he complete failure. If, on the other hand, I chose the Greenland route and found it impossible to proceed northward over the pack, I still had an unknown coast to exploit, and the opportunity of doing valuable work. Later developments showed my decision to be a fortunate one.
Stran 444 - ... was it the intention and meaning of said convention of 1825 that there should remain in the exclusive possession of Russia a continuous fringe or strip of coast on the mainland, not exceeding ten marine leagues in width, separating the British possessions from the bays, ports, inlets, havens, and waters of the ocean...
Stran 533 - A little further on a wide canal of open water deflected us constantly to the north-west and then west, until an area of extremely rough ice prevented us from following it farther. Viewed from the top of a high pinnacle this area extended west and north-west on both sides of the canal, as far as could be seen. I could only camp and wait for this canal, which evidently had been widened (though not newly formed) by the storm of the day before, to close up or freeze over. During our first sleep at this...

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