The Life and Public Services of Gen. Lewis Cass: Comprising His Services in the War of 1812, in the Senate of the United States, in the Cabinet, in Foreign Diplomatic Stations, and in the Highest Offices in Michigan, to which is Added, the Military and Civil Life of Gen. William O. Butler, Comprising His Services in the War of 1812, in Various Civil Capacities, and in the War with Mexico which Has Recently Terminated

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Belknap & Hamersley, 1848 - 64 strani
 

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Stran 35 - Can we stand still ; or must we advance ? As to receding, it is neither to be discussed nor thought of. I refer to it but to denounce it — a denunciation which will find a response in every American bosom. Nothing is ever gained by national pusillanimity. And the country which seeks to purchase temporary security by yielding to unjust pretensions, buys present ease at the expense of permanent honor and safety. It sows the wind...
Stran 59 - But in camp, his elevated principles, his intelligence and generous feelings, won for him the respect and confidence of all who knew him...
Stran 30 - But what has endeared you to every true American, was the noble stand which you took, as our Minister at Paris, against the quintuple treaty, and which by your talents, energy and fearless responsibility, defeated its ratification by France...
Stran 35 - ... denounce it — a denunciation which will find a response in every American bosom. Nothing is ever gained by national pusillanimity. And the country which seeks to purchase temporary security by yielding to unjust pretensions, buys present ease at the expense of permanent honor and safety. It sows the wind to reap the whirlwind. I have said elsewhere, what I will repeat here, that it is better to fight for the first inch of national territory than for the last.
Stran 29 - I have stood upon the plain of Marathon, the battle-field of liberty. It is silent and desolate. Neither Greek nor Persian is there to give life and animation to the scene. It is bounded by sterile hills on one side, and lashed by the eternal waves of the ^Egean sea on the other. But Greek and Persian were once there, and that dreary spot was alive with hostile armies who fought the great fight which rescued Greece from the yoke of Persia.
Stran 30 - In return for your kind expressions with regard to myself, I have to remark, that I shall ever recollect, my dear General, with great satisfaction, the relations, both private and official, which subsisted between us, during the greater part of my administration. Having full confidence in your abilities and republican principles, I invited you to my Cabinet; and I...
Stran 39 - ... subject matter involved in this issue. By going back to our true principles, we go back to the road of peace and safety. Leave to the people, who will be affected by this question, to adjust it upon their own responsibility, and in their own manner, and we shall render another tribute to the original...
Stran 26 - States, by force, to adopt their measures to its provisions, or to adopt its stipulations. They have too much confidence in their sense of justice to fear any such result ; and they will see with pleasure the prompt disavowal made by yourself, sir, in the name of your country, at the tribune of the Chamber of Deputies, of any intentions of this nature. But were it otherwise, and were it possible they might be deceived in this confident expectation, that would not alter in one tittle their course...
Stran 17 - He was conspicuous at the landing of the troops on the Canada shore, below Maiden, on the 27th of September, and conspicuous at the battle of the Thames, as the volunteer aid of the commanding general. I saw him in the midst of the battle, in the deep woods, upon the banks of the Thames, during the roar and clangor of fire-arms and savage yells of the enemy. Then I was a green youth of seventeen, and a volunteer from Kentucky.
Stran 28 - States, which provides for the co-operation of the latter in efforts to abolish the slave trade, but which contains no renunciation by the former of the extraordinary pretension, resulting, as she said, from the exigencies of these very efforts ; and which pretension I felt it my duty to denounce to the French government. In all this I presume to offer no further judgment than as I am personally affected by the course of the proceedings ; and I feel they have placed me in a false position, whence...

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