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Harris, Mr., of Salisbury, iii. 173;

V. 301.
Harrison, Elizabeth, her “Miscel-

lanies,” i. 176.
Harte, Dr., “Gustavus Adolphus,"

ii. 81; his excessive vanity, iv. 61,
Harwich, J., accompanies Boswell

to, i. 270-4.
Harwood, Dr., iii. 23.
Hastings, Warren, J.'s correspond-

ence with, iv. 52-6.
Hastie, the schoolmaster, prosecuted,

ii. 120; J.'s argument in favour of,

ii. 120-2.
Hawkesworth, Dr., i. 94; happy

imitations of J.'s style, i. 138.
Hawthornden, v. 318.
Hay's Martial, v. 293.
Hay, Lord Charles, iii. 6; court-

martial on, iv. 23.
Heberden, Dr., iv. 238.
Hebrides, ii. 173; Journey to, pub-

lished ii. 195; origin of J.'s ex-

pedition to, v. 1.
Hector, Mr., i. 35, 40, 82; ii. 292,

294; iv. 101, 254; letters from J.

to, iv. 107, 256.
Heeley, Mr., iv. 249; letters from

J. to, iv. 250.
Hell, Virgil's description of entrance

to, v. 247.
Henderson, Mr. John, iv. 203.
Henry, Dr. Robert, History of Bri-

tain, iii. 224.
Hereditary right, iii. 104.
Hervey, Hon. Henry, i. 59; Hon.

F., ii. 28; “ Hervey's Medita-
tions,” v. 279.
Hetherington's Charity, Miss Wil-

liams' petitions for, ii. 185.
“High Life below Stairs," iv. 13.
Highland hut, description of, v. 98;

travelling, v. 96; forest, v. 188;
tradition relative to two houses, v.
240; roads, formation of, v. 96.
Hill, Dr., ii. 33 ; v. 42.
History, remarks on, ii. 234 ; v. 54;

of England, v. 369.
Historians, ii. 126.
Hodge, J.'s cat, iv. 136.
Hogarth, his first interview with J.,

i. 74.
Holbrooke, Mr., i. 8.
Hollis, Mr. Thomas, iv. 72.
Home, John, parody by, i. 263; his

tragedy of “Douglas,” iii. 51; v.

287.
Homer. i. 14 ; v. 53; antiquity of,

iii. 222 ; compared with Virgil, iii.
129, 224 ; J.'s veneration for, ii.
86; v. 128; opinions respecting,
v. 53; Pope's “ Homer,” iii. 174.
Honesty, iv. 154.
Hooke, Mr., and Duchess of Marl-

borough, v. 136.
Hoole, Mr., his “ Cleonice,” ii. 187;

iv. 132, 276 ; letter from J. to, iv.

242; evening with, iv. 192.
Hope, Dr., iv. 181; v. 319.
Horace, i. 120, 121 ; ii. 231; iii. 169,

240 ; quotations from, ii. 226 ; v.
140; Francis's “Horace,” iii. 241;
translation of, i. 13; J. repeats
ode of, v. 126; Bentley and Jason
de Nore's comments on, ii. 285;

“ Art of Poetry,” iii. 176.
Horne, Bishop, ii. 285; Rev. Mr.,

his letter on the English particle,

iii. 239.
Hospitality, remarks on, iv. 20, 141,

153; ancient, ii. 110.
House of Commons, talents required

in, v. 214.
Houses, subterranean, v. 131, 187.
Households, large, iii. 212.
Howard, Mr., i. 31; iii. 151.
Hoy, Mr. James, Gordon Castle,

V. 81.
Huddesford, Dr., Vice-chancellor of

Oxford, letter to, i. 158, 159.
Huggins, translator of ós Ariosto,"

iv. 12.
Humanity, instance of J.'s, iv. 218.
Hume, David, i. 253, 256 ; ii. 13;

v. 13; his political principles, iv.
135; Dr. A. Smith's panegyrical

letter upon, v. 14.
Humphrey, Ozias, letter from J. to,

iv. 184.
Hunter, Mr., i. 8, 9.
Hunting, French, v. 200.
Hurd, Bishop, iv. 133, 198.
Hussey, Rev. Mr., letter from J. to,

iii. 249.
Hutchinson, William, remarkable

honesty of, v. 74.
Hypochondria, “ The English Ma-
lady,” i. 22; Professor Gaubin's
distinction between, and madness,
i. 22.

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ICELAND, natural history of, iii. 188.
“ Idler," i. 187-9.
Idleness, i. 248, 270.
Impartiality, historical, v. 201.
Impostor, pretended brother of J.,

v. 235.
Inch Keith, island of, v. 35.
Inchkenneth, ii. 172; v. 25.6.
India, government of, iv. 149.
Indian Judges, ii. 221.
Infidelity, ii. 12; iv. 197 ; v. 130;

conjugal, ii. 42; iii. 272.
Infidels, ii. 231; modern, v. 263;

writings, increase of, v 216.
Ingratitude, false story of J.'s, iii.

130.
Inns, J.'s love of, ii. 288; Shen-

stone's lines on, ii. 289.
Innovation, remarks on, iv. 133.
Inquisition, J. defends, i. 271.
Interest, landed and trading, com-

pared, v. 184.
Inverary, ii. 172; v. 276.
Inverness, ii. 172; v. 92; English

chapel at, v. 93; castle, v. 93.
Iona, ii. 172; v. 265.
Ireland, Ji's aversion to visit, iïi.

274; and the Irish, ii. 164; Union

with, iii. 274.
“Irene,” tragedy of, i. 46, 51, 52,

53, 78; performed at Drury Lane,
i. 96; ill success of, i. 106, 107;
J.'s dress on the occasion, i. 108 ;
manuscript copy of, i. 51; extracts

from, i. 52.
Isa, island of, v. 197.
Islands, prisons, a song, v. 202.
Italy, iii. 21; proposal that J. should

visit, iv. 221, 225.
JACOBITISM, i. 249.!
Jackson, “ The all-knowing,” ii. 12.
James, Dr., iii. 14.

death of, iii. 3.
“Medicinal Diction-

Johnson, Rev. Samuel, Curate of
St. Martin's-in-the-Fields, i.

Mrs, his wife, i. 40, 41,
42, 51, 114, 130, 132.

death of, i. 129.
JOHNSON, SAMUEL-

1709. Born at Lichfield, i. 1.
1712. Early religious impressions

from his mother, i. 3; anecdotes
of his precocity, i. 4; inherits his
father's disease, i. 6; touched

by Queen Anne, i. 7.
1719. Sent to Lichfield School, i. 7.
1724. Removed to Stourbridge

School, i. 11; poetical transla-

tions, i. 12-17.
1727. Leaves Stourbridge, i. 17;

two years at home, his pursuits

during that time, i. 18.
1728. Entered at Pembroke Col-

lege, Oxford, i. 18; incidents of
college life, i. 19, 26-29; trans-

lates Pope's “Messiah,” i. 20.
1729.Morbid melancholy increases

i. 21; religious impressions, i. 23.
1731. Leaves Oxford, i. 30; death

of his father, i. 30.
1733. Goes to Birmingham, em-

ployment there, i. 34; trans-

lates Lobo's “ Abyssinia,” i. 35.
1736. Marries, and opens academy

at Edial, i. 41-43; commences

tragedy of " Irene,” i. 46.
1737. Goes to London with Gar-

rick, i. 47; retires to Green-
wich, i. 50; returns to Lichfield
and publishes “Irene,” i. 51;
removes back to London with

Mrs. J., i. 54
1738. First contribution to “Gen-

tleman's Magazine,” i. 55;
reports parliamentary debates
in, i. 57; publishes poem of

“London," i. 62.
1739. Publishes “Marmor Wor-

folciense,” i. 72.
1743. Embarrassed circumstances,

i. 84.
1744. Publishes “Life of Richard

Savage,” i. 85.
1747. Publishes plan of “Dic-

tionary,” i. 97.
1748. Institutes club in Ivy Lane,

i. 102; visits Tunbridge Wells,
i. 102.

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ary," i. 83.

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Jennings, Mr., iii. 155.
Jenyns, Soame, iii. 189.

J.'s controversy with,
i. 178.
Johnson, Michael, father of Samuel,
i. 2, 3, 6, 18, 30.

Mrs., his mother, i. 3, 7,
23, 84, 192, 194, 195.

, Nathaniel, i. 37.

1749. Publishes “Vanity of Hu-

man Wishes,” i. 103; “Irene”

performed at Drury Lane, i. 106.
1750. Commences Rambler," i.

110.
1752. Close of “Rambler,” i. 123;

death of Mrs. J., i. 129; visits

Oxford, i. 136.
1753. Writes in “ Adventurer,”

i. 138.
1754. Writes “Life of Cave," i.

142; engaged with “Diction-

1776. Visits Bath and Bristol with

the Thrales, iii. 26; visits Brigh-

ton, iii. 60.
1777. Goes on provincial tour, iii.

91.
1778. Meets with Edwards, an old

college fellow, iii. 203.
1779. Publishes first four vols. of

“Lives of the Poets,” iii. 250.
1781. Completes “Lives of the

Poets,” iv. 31; provincial tour,

iv. 100.
1782. Constitutional disease in-

creases, iv. 101; Mrs. Thrale's

coolness to Johnson, iv. 115.
1783. Paralytic stroke, iv. 156;

institutes Essex Head Club. iv.

174; increased illness, iv. 175.
1784. Visits Oxford, iv. 194; pro-

poses to go to a warmer climate,
iv. 225, 234; last provincial
tour, iv. 237; last illness and
death, iv. 271-282.

ary,” i. 142.

66

1755. Receives A.M. degree, i.

158; “Dictionary” published,

i. 165.
1758. Commences “Idler," i. 187.
1759. Death of mother, i. 192;

publishes “ Rasselas,” i. 194.
1762. Obtains pension from George

III., i. 213; visits Devonshire

with Sir J. Reynolds, i. 215.
1763. First interview with Bos-

well, i. 225; accompanies Bos-

well to Harwich. i. 270.
1764. Visits the Langton family,

i. 277.
1765. Makes an excursion to Cam-

bridge with Beauclerk, i. 283;
degree, of LL.D. conferred by
University of Dublin, i. 284 ; en-
gagement with Gerard Hamil-
ton, i. 284; introduction to
Thrale family, i. 285; publishes

edition of “ Shakspeare,” i. 289.
1767. Interview with George III.,

ii. 30; visits Lichfield, ii. 35.
1768. Visits Oxford, ii. 37.
1769. Appointed Professor of An-

cient Literature, ii. 50.
1770. Publishes “False Alarm,"

ii. 76.
1771. Attempt to bring. J. into

Parliament, ii. 92; visits Lich-

field and Ashbourne, ii. 94.
1773. Publishes new editions of

“Dictionary” and “Shakspeare,”
ii. 134; sets out on Tour to the
Hebrides, ii. 173; writes account

of Tour, ii. 176.
1774. Visits Wales with Mr. and

Mrs. Thrale, ii. 185.
1775. Receives degree of LL.D.

from University of Oxford, ii.
214.

Character, habits, personal appear-

ance, &c.
Defective sight, i. 6; quickness of

observation, i. 6; indolence, i. 9,
35, 180, 268, 280; iii. 292; iv. 14.
Retentive

memory, i. 10, 146.
Early love of romance, i. 11.
Early poetical genius, i. 12, 20.
Morbid melancholy, i. 21, 22, 23,
168, 196, 280 ; iii. 62; iv. 206.
Irregular mode of study, i. 17,
24. Pride i. 28, 147. Manners,
i. 32, 44, 74, 75, 161, 227, 281;
ii. 15; iii. 32, 102, 192, 241; iv.
133, 202, 215.

Personal appear-
ance, i. 40, 73, 135, 228; iv.
220, 289; v. 4. Rapidity of
composition, i. 88, 103, 110,
188, 195 ; ii. 17; v. 45. Polite-
ness, i. 32; iii. 108; iv. 64, 93,
192. Love of chemistry, i. 71 ; ii.
103; iv, 162. Love of conviviality
and pleasures of the table, i. 136;
iii. 43, 124, 192, 224 ; iv. 68, 195,
223; v.42. Love of young people,
i. 257. Love of London life, l.
266 ; iv. 254. Love of Oxford,
i. 26 ; ii. 40, 122. Love of con-
tradiction, iii. 40, 210, 233; iv.
83; v. 56. Gratitude, i. 93; iv.
226, 227. Jacobite prejudices,

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on

i. 189;

i. 72, 74, 93, 168, 249 ; ii. 220;
iv. 118. Envy of Garrick, i. 88,
226; ii. 125. Tenderness of con-
science, i. 77. Prejudice against
actors, i. 88, 108; iii. 123; iv.
14. Moral and religious princi-
ples, i. 23, 148, 170; ii. 12,
115; iv. 281. Affection for his
mother, i. 84. Love for his wife,
i. 129; iii. 205. Unfitness for
tragedy writing, i. 108. Conver-
sational powers, i. 74, 111, 135,
243; iv. 83, 86, 130, 131, 161.
Deference to public opinion, i.
108; iv. 29.

Excellence as a
biographer, i. 142. Hatred of
Whigs and their principles, i.
249; ii. 112, 143, 285; iv. 66,
133, 153. Hatred of infidel
principles, i. 256; ii. 12, 14, 57,
63; iii. 33, 185, 203, 268, 278.
Respect for authority and rank,
i. 142, 175, 253, 258; ii. 16,
102, 144, 167; iii. 32, 126, 176,
239, 273; v. 73. Superstition,
i. 234; ii. 14, 116, 206; iii.
199, 236; iv. 70. Regard to
truth, i. 252; ii. 280; iii. 154,
197 ; iv. 121. Liberality in pe-
cuniary matters, i. 283. Dread
of death, ii. 62, 71, 194 ;
197; iv. 178, 179, 185, 203, 268,
278. Toleration, i. 233; ii. 69,
70, 71, 166; iii. 126; iv. 188.
Respect for the clergy, ii. 112 ;
iv. 59, 67, 138, 187. Reverence
for sacred subjects, ii. 138. Habit
of contracting friends' names, ii.
166. Remarkable laugh, ii. 168,
241; iii. 176. Personal courage,
ii. 194. Benevolence, ii. 209;
iii. 16, 81, 248, 279, 296, 297 ;
iv. 98, 134, 140, 218, 231. Habit
of using strong expressions, iii.
1, 195, 199, 211. Devotion, i.
129, 138, 141, 273, 280, 283 ;
ii. 124, 138; iv. 186. Know-
ledge of the world, ii. 12; of
law, iii. 14; of physic, iii. 14,
102. Generosity, iii. 151. Taci-
turnity, iii. 207 ; v. 49. Style
of dress, i. 108; iii. 218; v.5.
Violence of temper, iii. 34, 50,
138, 180, 183, 195, 199, 211,
223, 227, 234, 237; iv. 70, 74,

120, 122; v. 110. Irritability
of temper, i. 226; ii. 72; iii.
180; iv. 121, 123, 188, 193,
Vigour of mind in old age, iv.
22, 173, 175. Vanity, iv. 130.
Regard for literature, iv. 26, 29,
Extraordinary way of walking.
iv. 57. Appearance on horse-
back, v. 98. Readiness at retort,
iv. 131. Candour, iv. 163, 217.
Opinions on education, i. 9; ii.
12, 120, 123, 233, 262; iii. 8,
114, 259; V. 68; on friend-
ship, i. 169; on marriage, i.
218; ii. 54, 73, 109, 213, 292,
294, 303; iii. 3, 254; iv. 97;
on political economy, ii. 67;
on future state, ii. 108; iii.
135; duelling, ii. 117.
Contempt for belief in influence
of the weather, i. 188, 247, 260.
Contempt for rhetorical gesture,
ii. 137;

for ballad
poetry, ii. 138; for punning,
ii. 155; for tragic acting, v. 19;
for foreigners, i. 63; iv. 17.
Dislike to swearing, iii. 126; of
a sailor's life, iii 179; of being
thought old, iii. 204, 206, 226;
iv. 128; of literary superiority,
iv. 83. Prejudice against Scot-
land and the Scotch, i. 64, 148,
225, 242, 246; ii. 40, 53, 55,
82, 98, 112, 203, 217, 233, 242,
278; iii. 47, 101, 114, 167, 176,
226, 235; iv. 73, 76, 98, 120,
131; v. 6, 22, 24, 59. Pre-
judice against Americans, iii.
42, 125, 136, 138, 195, 211,

292.
“Johnsoniana,” ii. 279; iii. 219.
Jordan, Mr. J.'s. tutor at Pembroke

College, i. 18, 19, 20.
Journal des Savans, ii. 34.

keeping a, iv. 126.
Junius, iii. 254; iv. 207.
Juvenal, J's. translations of Satires,

i. 103.

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KAMEs, lord (Henry Home), ii, 41 ; v.

292; his“History of Man,”iii. 228
his

“ Elements of Criticism
praised, i. 226 ; ii. 61.
Keddlestone, seat of Lord Scarsdale,

iii.

iii. 107-9.

Kelly, Hugh, “Word to the Wise,”

iii. 74.
Kempis, Thomas à, editions of, iv.

190.
Ken, Bishop, his early rising, iii. 113.
Kennedy, Rev. Dr., system of astro-

nomical chronology, i. 210.
Kennicot's Hebrew Bible, v. 24;

Mrs., iv. 197.
Kenrick, Mr. W., his attack on Ji's
edition of Shakspeare, i. 289.

Dr., pamphlet attacking J.,
ii. 45.
Kettel Hall, Oxford, i. 150.
Kilda, St., Rev. K. Macaulay's ac-

count of, ii. 40, 101; v. 85, 220.
King, Dr., Principal of St. Mary's,

Oxford, i. 159 ; v. 157.
Kings, flattery of, ii. 151.
Kingsburgh, v. 142.
Kippis, Dr., iii. 117; v. 60.
Kneller, Sir Godfrey, anecdote of,

iii. 159.
Knotting, J.'s opinion of, iv. 194.
Knowles, Mrs., the Quakeress, iii. 48,

191, 193, 195, 201.
Knowledge all valuable, ii. 230.
Knox, Mr., opinion of Ji's “ Tour to
the Hebrides,” ii. 197.
-, John, v. 40.

the pedigree of nations, v. 177; the
Celtic, v. 193; the poets preserve

languages, iii. 21.
Lapouchin, Madame, sufferings of,

iii. 229.
Latin, spoken by J. to foreigners, ii.

259, 261 ; inscriptions, iv. 15;

graces, v. 43.
Latrobe, Rev. Mr., a Moravian min-

ister, iv. 278.
Law and lawyers, opinions on, ii. 13,

21, 37, 152, 278; v. 11, 59; ar-
guments on points of Scotch law
by J.-on vicious intromission, ii.
127; on church patronage, 156; on
entails, 266 ; on the liberty of the
pulpit, iii. 35 ; on the registration

of deeds, iv. 58 ; on libels, 95.
Lawrencekirk, village of, v. 51.
Lawrence, Dr. Thomas, iii. 14;

letters to, ii. 193 ; iii. 280; iv.

105-6.
Law's “Serious Call to a IIoly Life"

set J.to think earnestly of religion,

i. 23.
Laziness, v. 183.
Learning, iv. 16; v. 88, 54 ; general

diffusion of, iv. 151.
Lectures, on instruction by, iv. 69.
Lee, Arthur, an American patriot,
iii. 42.

Alderman, London, meets J.,
iii. 48.
Leeds, doggrel verses on Duke of,

iv. 17.
Legitimation by marriage, Scots’

law, ii. 291.
Leibnitz, his work on languages, ii.

104 ; dispute on, v. 227.
Leith, not Lethe, v. 34.
Leland, Dr. Thomas, Dublin, J.'s

letter to, on his diploma, i. 284;

his “ History of Ireland,” iii. 73.
Lennox, Mrs., her “Shakspeare Il-

lustrated,” i. 141; lier works, ii.

188; compliment to, iv. 188.
Leonidas, Glover's poem of, v. 82.
Letter-writing, fashion of publishing

letters, iv. 76; mode of ending, v.

189.
Levett, Robert, account of, i. 133-5;

letters to, ii. 182, 245 ; iii. 58 ; his
death, iv. 101 ; verses on, 102.

Mr., Lichfield, letter to, on
interest of debt, i. 84.

LABOUR, dangerous to increase the

price of, v. 210.
Ladies, influence of their society, iv.

58.
Lake in Rasay, strange legend con-

cerning, v. 132.
Landlords and tenants, v. 234.
Langton, Bennet, i. 135; dinners at

house of, iii. 188, 227; change in
circumstances of, iii. 224; his notes
of Ji's conversation, iv. 30; visited
by J. at Rochester, iv. 159; J.'s
high esteem for, iji. 109); letters
from J. to, i. 163, 183, 190-1, 205;
ii. 17-18, 36, 91, 95, 99, 182, 2:32,
241; iii, 81, 246 ; iv. 98, 106, 165,
182, 236, 243; J. visits family of,in
Lincolnshire, i. 277.

Peregrine, his remarkable
economy, ii. 18.

Miss Jane, J.'s godchild,
letter to, iv. 186.
Languages, ii. 105; connexion be-
tween, iii. 158; origin of, iv. 143;

Y

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