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WASHINGTON, January 10, 1862. The committee met pursuant to adjournment; all the members present.

The following witnesses were examined: Colonel George W. B. Tompkins, Lieutenant Philip J. Downey, and Captain Dennis De Courcy.

Adjourned to 10} a. m. tomorrow.

WASHINGTON, January 11, 1862. The committee met pursuant to adjournment; all the members present.

The following witnesses were examined: General John G. Barnard, Colonel David B. Birney, Colonel Isaac J. Wistar, and General Fitz-John Porter, (recalled.)

On motion of Mr. Chandler, Resolved, (unanimously,) That a sub-committee of three be appointed to wait

upon the Secretary of War and communicate to him the testimony relating to General Charles P. Stone.

The chairman appointed as such sub-committee Messrs. Chandler, Gooch, and Odell.

Adjourned to 11 a. m. on Monday next.

WASHINGTON, January 13, 1862. The committee met pursuant to adjournment; all the members present.

Mr. Chandler, from the sub-committee appointed upon Saturday last, reported that the committee waited upon the Secretary of War on Saturday night at 7 o'clock, and communicated to him the testimony as directed by the committee.

Adjourned to 104 a. m. to-morrow.

WASHINGTON, January 14, 1862. The committee met pursuant to adjournment; all the members present.

The following witnesses were examined: Captain Charles Griffin and Colonel Thomas A. Davies.

The chairman laid before the committee the following communication from General George B. McClellan:

“HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

" Washington, January 14, 1862. “Sir: I have the honor to state that the condition of my health is now such that I can appear before your committee when you wish The morning would be more convenient to me at present than a later period of the day. “Very respectfully,

"GEO. B. MCCLELLAN,

Major General Commanding. “Hon. B. F. WADE, Chairman Committee."

The chairman, in pursuance of instructions of the committee, addressed the following in reply:

"COMMITTEE Room, January 14, 1862. “Sır: Yours of to-day is received. Our committee will be in session tomorrow morning at 101 o'clock. If that hour will suit you, we shall be pleased to see you at that time; or if any other day or hour would better suit your convenience, in view of your public duties, please indicate it to us. “ I have the honor to remain your obedient servant,

“B. F. WADE, Chairman, “Major General Geo. B. McClelLAN,

" Commanding Army, Sc." Adjourned to 103 a. m. to-morrow.

WASHINGTON, January 15, 1862. The committee met pursuant to adjournment; all the members present.

General George B. McClellan waited upon the committee in accordance with arrangement of yesterday, and some time was passed in a full and free conference between him and the committee in relation to various matters connected with the conduct of the present war.

The following witness was examined: General Benjamin F. Butler.
Adjourned to 104 a. m. to-morrow.

WASHINGTON, January 16, 1862. The committee met pursuant to adjournment; all the members present.

The session was passed in consideration of various subjects, no witnesses being examined

Adjourned to 10} a. m. to-morrow.

WASHINGTON, January 17, 1862. The committee met pursuant to adjournment; all the members present.

The following witnesses were examined: General John C. Frémont, Captain James Brady, and Captain Francis G. Young.

Adjourned to 12 m. to-morrow.

WASHINGTON, January 18, 1862. The committee met pursuant to adjournment; absent, Mr. Johnson. The following witnesses were examined: Captain John H. Richardson, Philip Haynes, Major Jacob P. Gould, Andrew S. Rea, Colonel R. B. Price, and Colonel Craig Biddle.

Adjourned to 11 a. m. on Monday next.

WASHINGTON, January 20, 1862. The committee met pursuant to adjournment; all the members present.

The following witnesses were examined: General Daniel Tyler and General Daniel Butterfield.

The committee took a recess until 8 p. m. At 8 o'clock p. m the committee resumed their session ; all the members present, and had a conference of several hours' duration with honorable Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War, at his request.

Adjourued to 11 a. m. to-morrow.

WASHINGTON, January 21, 1862. The committee met pursuant to adjournment; all the members present.

The chairman was instructed by the committee to address the following to the Secretary of War.

“ COMMITTEE Room, &c.,

"Washington, January 21, 1862. “Sir: I am instructed by the joint committee on the conduct of the present war to inquire of you whether there is such an office as commander-in-chief of the army of the United States, or any grade above that of major general ? If so, by what authority is it created ? Does it exist by virtue of any law of Congress, or any usage of the government? “Please give us the information asked for at your convenience. "I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

“B. F. WADE, Chairman, dc. “Hon. Edwin M. Stanton,

Secretary of War."

The following witnesses were examined: Captain Wm. Wilson, Captain Clinton Barry, Lieutenant Henry R. Foote, General Andrew Porter, Major Bryan Laflin.

Mr. Gooch submitted the following joint role of the two houses of Con gress to be recommended to the two houses for adoption, which, upon motion of Mr. Chandler, was agreed to.

“When, during the present rebellion, any member of the Senate or of the House of Representatives shall rise in his place and state to the Senate or House of Representatives that the Executive desires immediate action of Congress upon any matter pertaining to the suppression of the present rebellion, the Senate or House of Representatives, as the case may be, shall immediately go into secret session and proceed to the consideration of the measure proposed ; and all debate thereon, if the previous question shall not have been ordered, shall be limited to five minutes for any member, and the final vote shall be taken before adjournment.

"During such session no communication shall be received, or made from or to any person not a member then present, except through the President of the Senate or Speaker of the House of Representatives; and a breach of secrecy of any matter transacted during such session (unless the injunction of secrecy be removed) by any senator or representative shall be punished by expulsion, and if committed by any officer of either body, or other person, such punishment shall be inflicted as the body to which he belongs may impose."

On motion of Mr. Chandler, The chairman and Mr. Gooch were instructed to report the foregoing joint rule to their respective houses, and recommend that the same be adopted.

Adjourned to 11 a. m. to-morrow.

WASHINGTON, January 22, 1862. The committee met pursuant to adjournment; all the members present. The following witness was examined: General Daniel Tyler recalled. The chairman introduced for the consideration of the committee

A bill to authorize the President of the United States, in certain cases, to take possession of railroad and telegraph lines, and for other purposes.

The committee proceeded to consider the bill, which, after some amendments, was agreed to as amended.

The chairman was instructed to report the bill to the Senate and recommend its passage.

Adjourned to 11 a. m. to-morrow.

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WASHINGTON, January 23, 1862. The committee met pursuant to adjournment; all the members present. The following witness was examined: General Irvin McDowell, recalled.

The chairman laid before the committee a communication he had received from Thornton Smith, quartermaster Excelsior brigade, (General Sickles,) in relation to certain transactions of General Sickles.

The communication was read, and after discussion, The chairman was directed to enclose the same to the Secretary of War, with the following letter:

“COMMITTEE Room, &c.,

Washington, January 23, 1862. "Sir: I am instructed by the joint committee on the conduct of the war to enclose to you the within communication, which has been laid before this committee. They deem it a matter of sufficient importance to merit some attention, but they are of the opinion that it belongs more properly to your department than to the committee. I remain

your
obedient servant,

“B. F. WADE, Chairman. "Hon. Edwin M. STANTON, Secretary of War."

The chairman, under the instructions of the committee, also addressed the following letter to the Secretary of War:

"COMMITTEE Room,

Washington, January 23, 1862. “Sir: It appears from evidence before the joint committee on the conduct of the present war that our army now has in service all the cavalry force that can be used to advantage. It has also come to our knowledge that there are scattered over the country many regiments formed and in process of forming. In view of the fact that this is the most expensive arm of the service, both in outfit and support, we deem it only proper to call your attention to what seems to us a very important matter. We do so especially in view of the financial condition of the country, as well as the difficulty of furnishing with forage the horses even now in service. If the officers having the confidence of the government are correct in their opinion that no more is needed, surely the great expense incident to this service should require that these new regiments be dispensed with at once. I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. F. WADE, Chairman. "Hon. Edwin M. STANTON, Secretary of War."

The chairman was also instructed to report the following resolution to the Senate and recommend its adoption:

Resolved, That the joint committee on the conduct of the present war be authorized to employ a stenographer, who shall be paid out of the contingent fund of the Senate, at the same rate of compensation as that received by the reporters of the Congressional Globe.”

The committee then went into secret session, the stenographer and the clerk being directed to leave the committee room. After some time spent therein the stenographer and clerk were readmitted.

Adjourned to 11 a. m. to-morrow.

WASHINGTON, January 24, 1862. The committee met pursuant to adjournment; all the members present. The following witness was examined: Captain Thomas H. Hunt. Adjourned to 12 m. tomorrow.

WASHINGTON, January 25, 1862. The committee met pursuant to adjournment. Absent: Mr. Johnson.

The following witnesses were examined: Lieutenant Church Howe, Captain Wm. Judkins, Sergeant Charles Edgerly.

On motion of Mr. Odell, it was ordered that Mr. Gooch and Mr. Johnson be a sub-committee to wait upon the President and make the necessary inquiries in relation to the military administration of General John C. Frémont.

Mr. Gooch said that as Mr. Johnson might not be able to wait upon the President with him, he (Mr. Johnson) being absent from the committee to-day, he would move that Mr. Odell be appointed a substitute to act in place of Mr. Johnson, in case business or other circumstance rendering Mr. Johnson unable to attend.

The motion was agreed to.
Adjourned to 101 o'clock a. m. on Monday next.

WA

ASHINGTON, January 27, 1862. The committee met parsuant to adjournment; the chairman, Messrs. Chandler, Gooch, and Julian present.

The following witnesses were examined: Major J. J. Dimmick, Captain J. J. Delaney, Colonel Charles Devens.

On motion of Mr. Gooch, it was Ordered, That a sub-committee of three be appointed to wait upon the Secretary of War and communicate to him additional testimony in relation to General Stone.

The chairman appointed Messrs. Gooch, Chandler, and Julian as such subcommittee.

Adjourned to 104 a. m. to-morrow.

WASHINGTON, January 28, 1862. The committee met pursuant to adjournment. Present: The chairman, Messrs. Chandler, Gooch, and Julian.

Mr. Gooch, from the sub-committee appointed yesterday, reported that the committee waited upon the Secretary of War at his residence last night at 7 o'clock, and performed the duty assigned them.

The following witnesses were examined: General N. P. Banks, Colonel Halbert E. Paine, Captain W. P. Moore, Colonel G. K. Warren, Colonel S. A. Bean, Major Edward Bacon, Colonel Wm. W. Averill, Lieutenant Charles E. Hazlitt, Lieutenant Horatio B. Reed.

Adjourned to 11 a. m. to-morrow.

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