Education Series, Količina 5

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University of Minnesota, 1924
 

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The junior college and preprofessional requirements 6578
65
Increments of enrolment for each type of higher institution for each por
69
Frequency of prescription of special subjects and courses
76
Practices and attitudes of fouryear colleges touching the junior college
79
Numbers of colleges having and not having received applications
81
The junior college and mental democratization of higher education 87122
87
Average percentages of pages of textual materials in twentyfive high
90
Percentage distributions of 63 sophomore women in 7 public and 182
92
Distributions of scores made in the Army Alpha Test by 322
95
Percentage distributions of Alpha scores of sophomores in 7 public junior
99
Distributions of scores in the Army Alpha Tests of freshmen
102
Percentage distributions of scores on the Thurstone Test of 206 freshmen
105
Numbers and per cents of freshmen in the College of Science
108
Percentages of students in low middle and high groups whose averages
111
Percentages of students in low middle and high groups with
114
Percentages of eliminated students taking courses in certain subject groups
118
The claim made for the junior college and how examined
123
Ability to go elsewhere of students living at home while in attendance
125
The annual cost of attendance
127
Popularization through propinquity of opportunities for higher education
134
Percentage distribution by occupational groups of the fathers
138
Conclusions from the inquiry
141
The junior college and training for semiprofessions 14466
144
Current outcroppings of semiprofessional training
145
Expert opinion on semiprofessions
152
fields 15860
158
Other possible lines for semiprofessions
163
Major inferences
164
The junior college and home influences during immaturity 16772
167
Ranges in age of middle 50 per cent and median ages of 1 freshmen
170
Conclusion
172
The junior college and the individual student 17381
173
The size of classes in junior colleges colleges and universities
174
Distribution of classes by size in junior colleges and fouryear
175
Median and quartile numbers of students in classes in public junior col
177
The influence of large institutional registrations
180
Epitome
181
The junior college and training in leadership 18288
182
Numbers and percentages of public and private junior colleges
183
Student memberships in these organizations
185
Comparison of officeholding by sophomores
186
Conclusions
187
Junior college instructionI Personnel teaching load and remunera tion of staff 189213
189
The extent of preparation
190
Numbers and percentages of instructors without degrees
191
Percentages of instructors without degrees and with Bachelors Masters
192
Special preparation for the subjects taught
195
Percentages of instructors in junior colleges in fouryear colleges and
198
Training in education
200
The teaching load
201
Numerical and percentage distributions of instructors by
202
Median and quartile clock hours in the teaching load of instructors
204
Experience
205
Remuneration
208
Major conclusions and implications
211
Junior college instructionII Its character as shown by observa tion and comparison 21432
214
The instruction compared
218
Distributions of ranks assigned to skill in teaching of junior college
220
Lag of level of class performance behind scholarship of
225
Distributions of lags of level of class performance behind scholarship
226
Distributions of ranks assigned to personal and social qualities of instruc
229
Comparison of the percentage distributions of marks given to 1 junior
236
THE FORCES OF REORGANIZATION
239
The concurrence of the findings of this and the preceding chap ters 230
241
Distribution of ages at entrance to Harvard of freshmen
244
Median ages and ranges in age of the middle 50 per cent of freshmen
245
The widening scope of college entrance requirements 25157
251
The history of requirements for admission in Latin Amherst
253
The downward shift of the materials of the college curriculum 25862
258
The college years in which certain subjects appeared in succeed
259
Percentages of college graduates in the selection of whose major subjects
282
Numbers and percentages of college graduates in certain occu
288
Retention and elimination in colleges and universities 30620
306
Percentage of retention for Mount Holyoke Bates and all eastern colleges
312
Comparison of percentages of corrected retention with retention in same
318
The trend of enrolment in higher institutions 32141
321
Index numbers showing the comparative rates of increase in the total popu
324
Percentages of students enrolled in each type of higher institution and
332
Percentage distribution of students to certain divisions of twelve mid
339
The European analogy 34253
342
The aims of secondary school college and university 35476
354
Aims and functions of secondary education and the percentages in a total
355
Percentages of statements recognizing certain college aims
361
Percentages of work offered in the first two college years of secondary
396
Overlapping in the nature of repetition
399
Current efforts to avoid repetition
401
Summary and anticipation
403
Overlapping in English literature 40424
404
Numbers of clock hours in high school and college courses
405
A comparison of the textbooks used
406
Percentages of high school and college textbooks in the history of English
410
Overlapping in the classics read in high school and college
414
Quantitative requirements compared
420
Methods and related matters
421
Opinions of instructors as to differences between high school and college courses
423
Overlapping in English composition 42542
425
Analysis of the study and reading content of instruction in com position
426
Median percentages of courses in composition devoted to the groups
431
Distribution of high schools and colleges by percentages
432
A comparison of quantitative requirements
439
Summary and significance
441
Overlapping in elementary French 44355
443
The nature of the content of the courses
444
Median numbers of equated pages and percentages of high school
448
Median numbers of equated pages of content devoted to the several divisions
449
Quantitative differences in the courses
453
Epitome and conclusion
454
Overlapping in high school and college algebra 45673
456
Comparison of the amount and character of the content
457
college algebra
461
Size of sections methods
471
Overlapping in chemistry 47493
474
Comparison of the content of high school and college texts
475
Comparison of the distribution to the several subdivisions of the space
479
Comparison of high school and college laboratory manuals
485
Quantitative differences between college and high school courses
488
Further comparisons of high school and college courses
490
Opinions as to differences between college and high school courses
491
Recapitulation and conclusion
492
Overlapping in American history 494513
494
The textbooks and the courses
495
school and college courses in American history
496
Numbers of equated pages of high school and college textbooks dealing
503
Reference readings of the courses in American history
505
Quantitative requirements of high school and college courses
507
Supplementary considerations
510
Recapitulation and conclusion
511
CHAPTERS PAGES XXXV Overlapping in economics 51425
514
The nature of the content of the courses represented
515
Quantitative differences
520
Aspects of the conduct of courses in economics
522
Opinions as to differences between the courses
523
Overlapping in high school and collegea resumé 52631
526
INSTITUTING THE JUNIOR COLLEGE PLAN
533
Evaluating the types of junior colleges 53572
535
Evaluating the main types of junior colleges
538
The normal school type as a special problem
550
Percentage distribution of scores obtained on Army Alpha Test Form
554
Further consideration of the private junior college
561
Other types of junior colleges
563
The logical organization of secondary education
564
The junior college and the remaining claims made for it
568
A summary of the evaluation of the types of junior colleges
570
Relationship of the types of institutions giving junior college work to
571
The source of the student body 57390
573
The distribution of students by lines of work year of work and sex
574
Enrolment in higher institutions as related to the size of high schools numbers in the last two graduating classes and the populations of the cities of lo...
575
Where to establish junior colleges
581
Obstacles to be overcome
586
Numbers of graduates of high schools in connection with which
587
The financial problem 591624
591
The cost of items other than teaching
596
The curricular distribution of students as a factor in cost
601
The financial problem of establishing junior colleges in par ticular communities in two states
605
schools in cities of Minnesota with populations of 1000020000
612
Percentages of increment of local tax rate for schools to maintain junior
616
The state aid necessary for maintaining junior colleges
617
Conclusions
623
Junior college standards and other administrative problems 62547
625
Other administrative problems
642
APPENDICES PAGES
649
A Lists of junior colleges 65159
651
B Standards and principles for accrediting junior colleges 66061
660
Selected bibliography 66265
662
LIST OF FIGURES
663

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