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A CAMP BRAWL.

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began to fly when jokes were wanting. The parties waxed warm with the contest.

They closed, and came to blows; both sides were reinforced, and in a little while at least a thousand were at fisticuffs, and there was a tumult in the camp worthy of the days of Homer. “ At this juncture," writes our informant, “ Washington made his appearance, whether by accident or design, I never knew. I saw none of his aides with him; his black servant just behind him mounted. He threw the bridle of his own horse into his servant's hands, sprang from his seat, rushed into the thickest of the melée, seized two tall brawny riflemen by the throat, keeping them at arm's-length, talking to and shaking them."

As they were from his own province, he may have felt peculiarly responsible for their good conduct; they were engaged, too, in one of those sectional brawls which were his especial abhorrence; his reprimand must, therefore, have been a vehement one. He was commanding in his serenest moments, but irresistible in bis bursts of indig. pation. On the present occasion, we are told, his appearance and strong-handed rebuke put an instant end to the tumult. The combatants dispersed in all directions, and in less than three minutes none remained on the ground but the two he had collared.

The veteran who records this exercise of military authority, seems at a loss which most to admire, the simplicity of the process or the vigor with which it was administered. “ Here," writes he, “ bloodshed, imprisonments, trials by courtmartial, revengeful feelings between the different corps of the army, were happily prevented by the physical and mental energies of a single perBon, and the only damage resulting from the fierce encounter was a few torn hunting frocks and round jackets.” 1

1 From memoranda written at an advanced age, by the late Hon. Israel Trask; who, when but ten years old, was in the camp at Cambridge with his father, who was a lieutenant.

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Affairs in Canada. — Arnold at Point Levi. — Quebec Rein. forced. — Crossing of the St. Lawrence. — Landing in Wolfe's Cove. Arnold on the Heights of Abraham. Cautious Counsel. - Quebec Aroused. — The Invaders baf. Aed. — Withdraw to Point Aux Trembles. — Booming of Cannon. Carleton at Quebec. — Letter of Washington to Arnold.

E again turn from the siege of Boston, to

the invasion of Canada, which at that

time shared the anxious thoughts of Washington. His last accounts of the movements of Arnold, left him at Point Levi, opposite to Quebec. Something brilliant from that daring officer was anticipated. It was his intention to cross the river immediately. Had he done so, he might have carried the town by a coup de main ; for terror as well as disaffection prevailed among the inhabitants. At Point Levi, however, he was brought to a stand ; not a boat was to be found there. Letters which he had dispatched some days previously, by two Indians, to Generals Schuyler and Montgomery, had been carried by his faithless messengers, to Caramhe, the lieutenAnt-governor, who, thus apprised of the impenda ing danger, had caused all the boats of Point Levi to be either removed or destroyed.

martial, revengeful feelings between the different corps of the army, were happily prevented by the physical and mental energies of a single perBon, and the only damage resulting from the fierce encounter was a few torn hunting frocks and round jackets.”

1 From memoranda written at an advanced age, by the late Hon. Israel Trask; who, when but ten years old, was in the camp at Cambridge with his father, who was a lieutenant.

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