pt. I. From the rise of the modern kingdoms to the peace of Westphalia, in 1648

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Harper & brothers, 1839
 

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Again marches into Italy and expels the Sara his dominions with Canute
101
His son Harold Harefoot succeeds himn in
115
His brother establishes himself on the throne of 1286 Edward revives a claim of feudal superiority
116
LETTER XXI
118
Disorders of the monks and nuns
124
France and England
125
The first years of his reign distinguished by the suc signs
133
But every where disarms the natives and places
151
courts popularity 146 1139 Dies in the twelfth year of his reign and
157
Divorces
160
She is joined by several barons
173
Henry I dies leaving his daughter Matilda Eleanor his queen heiress of Guienne and Poitou
176
Henry II sends ambassadors to Rome to main Quarrel at Messina in the island of Sicily but
179
His kingdom is laid under an interdict by the 1215 The pope absolves king John from the oath
184
The English barons have recourse to arms and Death and character of John
198
Italy and Germany desolated by civil wars 253 Sequel of the story of Joan queen of Naples 265
201
The champions of the cross make themselves sade
204
His son Philip surnamed the Hardy saves the re Bruce and Baliol the two competitors
207
Reflections on the government of the Anglo pair is followed by many of the chief nobility
216
The Cid conquers Valencia from the Moors 208 Edward attempts the recovery of Guienne which
219
Revival of the study of the civil law 213 Battle of Bannockburn
225
Troubles of Germany and usurpations of the Roman 1067 Confirms the nobility and gentry in the pos
227
That rigour ultimately favourable to the cause of Lewis follows Conrad and is not more fortu
232
The laws of England established in the prin 1327 The king accused of incapacity for govern
245
Nicholas Rienzi an ambitious demagogue excites 1414 Description of the meeting of that council
256
Accession of Richard II son of the Black nity
271
He arrives in the East Indies
346
They monopolize the trade of the East Indies 348 Chagrin of Francis
359
Admitted by Montezuma into the city of Mexico 354 Perilous state of Francis I
365
Decay of Henrys affections for his queen Anne He summons a diet at Augsburg finally to compose
384
The duke of Norfolk suppresses a rebellion in Lin Publishes a temporary system of doctrine and wor
401
They style themselves the Congregation of the She bestows her confidence on the leaders of
406
Death of Henry VIII 394 Ferdinand king of the Romans the emperors
407
Somerset obliged to return in order to quell the Hostilities in the Netherlands Italy and Hun
413
Execution of his brother lord Seymour 413 Germany enjoys profound tranquillity
426
She is obliged to resign it to the princess Mary 417 queen
433
Petition the convocation that prayers may be said to be sincere in her professions of good
439
177
446
The Protestants prepare for their defence 440 reigns
448
He passes the edict of Nantes in favour of the 1601 On finding his intrigues are discovered he
449
Decline of the power of the duke of Guise and joy not of a criminal passion
454
In the struggles between the king and the nobles the He is dishonoured by queen Eleanor his pious con
457
Bothwell makes his escape and dies in a foreign gonous
458
The Scottish parliament summoned by
471
beth
484
Are threatened by the famous Catholic League Her spirited defence
486
minions
487
His death
492
LETTER LXXII
503
Ambitious projects of his minister Olivares
517
Success of Drake
531

Pogosti izrazi in povedi

Priljubljeni odlomki

Stran 480 - ... such an end put to her tedious sufferings, as she has long expected. Bear witness, that I die constant in my religion ; firm in my fidelity towards Scotland ; and unchanged in my affection to France. Commend me to my son. Tell him I have done nothing injurious to his kingdom, to his honour, or to his rights; and God forgive all those who have thirsted, without cause, for my blood.
Stran 421 - ... ease, and very little for the enjoyment of private pleasure ; that, either in a pacific or hostile manner, he had visited Germany nine times, Spain six times, France four times, Italy seven times, the Low...
Stran 326 - Behold,' says he, pointing to these and raising his voice, ' the powers which I have received from his catholic majesty. With these I govern Castile ; and with these I will govern it...
Stran 178 - ... the images, the statues of the saints were laid on the ground ; and as if the air itself were profaned, and might pollute them by its contact, the priests carefully covered them up, even from their own approach and veneration. The use of bells entirely ceased in all the churches : the bells themselves were removed from the steeples, and laid on the ground with the other sacred utensils.
Stran 416 - Christ was the word that spake it; He took the bread and brake it; And what the word did make it, That I believe, and take it.
Stran 116 - A scrupulous adherence to truth, with the most religious attention to fulfil every engagement, became the distinguishing characteristic of a gentleman, because chivalry was regarded as the school of honour, and inculcated the most delicate sensibility with respect to those points.
Stran 351 - From that time, like everything else which falls into the hands of the Mussulman, it has been going to ruin, and the discovery of the passage to India by the Cape of Good Hope gave the deathblow to its commercial greatness.
Stran 350 - Vincent Valverde, chaplain to the expedition, advanced with a crucifix in one hand, and a breviary in the other, and in a long discourse...
Stran 275 - ... the great advantages which might still be reaped from her presence in the army, exhorted her to persevere, till, by the final expulsion of the English, she had brought all her prophecies to their full completion.
Stran 415 - He sometimes whipped the prisoners with his own hands, till he was tired with the violence of the exercise : he tore out the beard of a weaver who refused to relinquish his religion; and that he might give him a specimen of burning, he held his hand to the candle till the sinews and veins shrunk and burst7.

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