The Federalist: A Collection of Essays by Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison, Interpreting the Constitution of the United States as Agreed Upon by the Federal Convention, September 17, 1787

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Colonial Press, 1901 - 488 strani
 

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Vsebina

I
1
II
5
III
10
IV
14
V
18
VI
22
VII
27
VIII
33
LIII
252
LIV
257
LV
264
LVII
271
LVIII
276
LX
281
LXI
284
LXII
289

IX
38
XII
44
XIII
52
XIV
58
XV
64
XVI
66
XVII
72
XVIII
80
XIX
85
XXII
89
XXIV
95
XXV
101
XXVI
105
XXVII
110
XXVIII
119
XXIX
124
XXX
129
XXXI
134
XXXII
140
XXXIII
144
XXXIV
148
XXXV
153
XXXVI
157
XXXVII
165
XXXVIII
171
XXXIX
177
XL
183
XLI
189
XLII
196
XLIII
205
XLIV
211
XLV
219
XLVIII
228
LI
235
LII
244
LXIII
294
LXIV
299
LXVII
305
LXVIII
310
LXIX
314
LXX
320
LXXII
325
LXXIII
330
LXXIV
336
LXXV
340
LXXVI
346
LXXVIII
354
LXXIX
360
LXXX
365
LXXXI
371
LXXXII
375
LXXXIV
379
LXXXV
386
LXXXVI
394
LXXXVIII
398
LXXXIX
403
XC
409
XCIII
412
XCVI
417
XCVII
422
XCVIII
425
XCIX
427
C
435
CI
438
CII
444
CIII
454
CIV
458
CV
472
CVI
482
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Priljubljeni odlomki

Stran 46 - A landed interest, a manufacturing interest, a mercantile interest, a moneyed interest, with many lesser interests, grow up of necessity in civilized nations, and divide them into different classes, actuated by different sentiments and views.
Stran 135 - That the raising or keeping a standing army within the kingdom in time of peace, unless it be with consent of parliament, is against law.
Stran 268 - In the government of this commonwealth, the legislative department shall never exercise the executive and judicial powers, or either of them : the executive shall never exercise the legislative and judicial powers, or either of them: the judicial shall never exercise the legislative and executive powers, or either of them : to the end it may be a government of laws and not of men.
Stran 247 - No state shall, without the consent of congress, lay any duty on tonnage, keep troops or ships of war in time of peace, enter into any agreement or compact with another state or with a foreign power, or engage in war, unless actually invaded or in such imminent danger as will not admit of delay.
Stran 435 - NEXT to permanency in office, nothing can contribute more to the independence of the judges than a fixed provision for their support.
Stran 47 - When a majority is included in a faction, the form of popular government, on the other hand, enables it to sacrifice to its ruling passion or interest both the public good and the rights of other citizens. To secure the public good and private rights against the danger of such a faction, and at the same time to preserve the spirit and the form of popular government, is then the great object to which our inquiries are directed.
Stran 48 - The two great points of difference between a democracy and a republic are: first, the delegation of the government, in the latter, to a small number of citizens elected by the rest; secondly, the greater number of citizens, and greater sphere of country, over which the latter may be extended.
Stran 286 - In the compound republic of America, the power surrendered by the people is first divided between two distinct governments, and then the portion allotted to each subdivided among distinct and separate departments. Hence a double security arises to the rights of the people. The different governments will control each other, at the same time that each will be controlled by itself.
Stran 246 - Bills of attainder, ex post facto laws, and laws impairing the obligation of contracts, are contrary to the first principles of the social compact, and to every principle of sound legislation.
Stran 372 - to nominate, and " by and with the advice and consent of the senate, to appoint " ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls, judges of the " supreme court, and all other officers of the United States, whose " appointments are not in the constitution otherwise provided for, " and which shall be established by law.

O avtorju (1901)

Alexander Hamilton was born on January 11, 1757 on the West Indian Island of Nevis. His mother died in 1769, around the same time his father went bankrupt. Hamilton joined a counting house in St. Croix where he excelled at accounting. From 1772 until 1774, he attended a grammar school in Elizabethtown, New Jersey, and went on to study at King's College. Hamilton entered the Revolutionary movement in 1774 at a public gathering in New York City with a speech urging the calling of a general meeting of the colonies. That same year, he anonymously wrote two pamphlets entitled, A Full Vindication of the Measures of Congress from the Calumnies of Their Enemies and The Farmer Refuted. When the Revolutionary War began, Hamilton joined the army and became a Captain of artillery, where he served with distinction in the battles of Long Island, White Plains, Trenton and Princeton. He was introduced to George Washington by General Nathaniel Greene with a recommendation for advancement. Washington made Hamilton his aide-de-camp and personal secretary. He resigned in 1781 after a dispute with the General, but remained in the army and commanded a New York regiment of light infantry in the Battle of Yorktown. Hamilton left the army at the end of the war, and began studying law in Albany, New York. He served in the Continental Congress in 1782-83, before returning to practice law, becoming one of the most prominent lawyers in New York City. In 1786, Hamilton participated in the Annapolis Convention and drafted the resolution that led to assembling the Constitutional Convention in 1787. He then helped to secure the ratification of the Constitution of New York with the help of John Jay and James Madison, who together wrote the collection of 85 essays which would become known as The Federalist. Hamilton wrote at least 51 of the essays. In 1789, Washington appointed him the first Secretary of the Treasury, a position at which he excelled at and gained a vast influence in domestic and foreign issues, having convinced Washington to adopt a neutral policy when war broke out in Europe in 1793. In 1794, Hamilton wrote the instructions for a diplomatic mission which would lead to the signing of Jay's Treaty. He returned to his law practice in 1795. President John Adams appointed Hamilton Inspector General of the Army at the urging of Washington. He was very much involved with the politics of the country though, and focused his attentions on the presidential race of 1800. Hamilton did not like Aaron Burr and went out of his way to make sure that he did not attain a nomination. Similarly, when Burr ran for mayor of New York, Hamilton set about to ruin his chances for that position as well. Burr provoked an argument with Hamilton to force him to duel. Hamilton accepted and the two met on July 11, 1804 at Weehawken, New Jersey. Hamilton was shot and mortally wounded and died on July 12, 1804.

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