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RIVERSIDE.

Area: 7,240 square miles.
Population: 34,696 (1910 census).

Location: Southern portion of state. Riverside is the fourth county in the state in size and the seventeenth in regard to the total value of mineral output for 1915. Within its borders are included mountain, desert, and agricultural land. Its mineral resources include metals, structural and industrial materials, and salines, some of the more important being asbestos, borax, brick, cement, clay, coal, copper, gems, gold, graphite, gypsum, iron, lead, limestone, manganese, magnesite, marble, mineral paint, mineral water, nitre, salt, glass-sand, soapstone, silver, miscellaneous stone, and tin.

Commercial production for 1915 was as follows:

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SACRAMENTO.
Area: 983 square miles.
Population: 90,000 (estimate by Chamber of Commerce, 1913).

Location: North central portion of state. Sacramento stands twelfth among the counties of the state as a mineral producer, the output, principally gold, for 1915 being valued at $2,562,281, as compared with the 1914 production, worth $2,632,658. In regard to gold output alone this county ranks fourth, being exceeded only by Amador, Nevada, and Yuba counties. Its mineral resources include: Brick, clay, gold, natural gas, platinum, silver, and miscellaneous stone.

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Area: 1,392 square miles.
Population: 8,041 (1910 census).

Location: West central portion of state. Although twenty-sixth among the counties of the state in regard to value of total mineral production, San Benito leads in one importan: branch of the mineral industry, namely, quicksilver.

Its other mineral resources, many of them undeveloped, include: Antimony, bituminous rock, chromite, coal, gypsum, gems, limestone, mineral water, soapstone, and miscellaneous stone.

Commercial production for 1915 was as follows:

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Area: 20,157 square miles.
Population: 75,000 (estimate by Board of Supervisors, 1913).

Location: Southeastern portion of state. San Bernardino, by far the largest county in the state, ranks eleventh as regards the value of its mineral output for 1915, with a total of $2,674,042, as compared with the 1914 total of $1,614,606. The marked increase is due mainly to tungsten and gold, the well-known Atolia district contributing the former.

This county, consisting largely of mountain and desert country, is highly mineralized, a few of the more important mineral resources

being: Asbestos, barytes, borax, brick, cement, clay, copper, gems, gold, gypsum, iron, lead, limestone, manganese, marble, mineral paint, mineral water, nitre, potash, salt, glass-sand, silver, soapstone, soda, miscellaneous stone, talc, tungsten, tuff, vanadium, and zinc. Commercial production for 1915 was as follows:

Brick
Cement

Copper

Gold

Lead

Limestone

Mineral water

Salt

Silver

Stone, miscellaneous

Tungsten concentrates

Zinc

Other minerals*

Total

Brick
Copper

Gems

Gold

Lead

Mineral water

Substance

Salt

Silver

Stone, miscellaneous

Other minerals

Total

Amount

400 M.

915,000 bbls.

209,440 lbs.

169,183 lbs.

68,500 tons
37,480 gals.

542 tons

Substance

864 tons

39,848 lbs.

*Includes dolomite, gypsum, lime, manganese, marble, mineral paint, soapstone and talc

SAN DIEGO.

Area: 4,221 square miles.

Population: 140,000 (estimate by Chamber of Commerce, 1913).
Location: Extreme southwest corner of state.

San Diego, first in California in the production of gem stones, ranks thirty-sixth in the total value of its mineral output. This figure for 1915 equaled $211,129, as compared to the 1914 output, worth $315,267. Aside from minerals commercially produced, as shown below, San Diego County contains deposits of asbestos, bismuth, lithia mica, marble, potash, soapstone, tin, and tungsten.

A new development is the shipping of pebbles for grinding mills. Commercial production for 1915 was as follows:

Value

Amount

$2,400 980,000

36,652

416,967 7,952

68,500

7,350

3,324

64,165

1,260 M.
3,008 lbs.

178,528

840,947

23 lbs.

10,350 gals.
17,616 tons

4,941

62,316

$2,674,042

Value

$21,025 526 2,465 1,364 1 1,035

19,616 9

163,723 1,365

$211,129

Stone, miscellaneous

Total

Area: 43 square miles.

Population: 527,000 (estimate by Chamber of Commerce, 1915). Surprising as it may appear at first glance, San Francisco County is listed among the mineral producing sections of the state, actual production consisting of crushed rock, sand, and gravel. Small quantities of various valuable mineral substances are found here, including cinnabar, gypsum, lignite, and magnesite, none, however, in paying quantities. In forty-second place, commercial production for 1915 was as follows:

SAN FRANCISCO.

Brick

Manganese
Natural gas

Stone, miscellaneous

Other minerals

Total

Substance

Substance

SAN JOAQUIN.

Area: 1,448 square miles.
Population: 50,731 (1910 census).
Location: Central portion of state.

San Joaquin County reported a mineral production for the year 1915 having a total value of $248,394, as compared with the 1914 output, worth $129,930. Comparatively few mineral substances are found here, the chief ones being brick, clay, infusorial earth, manganese, natural gas, glass-sand, and miscellaneous stone.

In thirty-fourth place, commercial production for 1915 was as follows:

SAN LUIS OBISPO.

Amount

3,000 M.

460 tons 161,923 M cu. ft.

Value

$128,270 $128,270

Value

$75,000 7,400 143,974 21,620

400

$248,394

Area: 3,334 square miles.
Population: 19,383 (1910 census).

Location: Bordered by Kern County on the east and the Pacific

Ocean on the west.

The total value of the mineral production of San Luis Obispo County in 1915 was $227,632, as compared with the 1914 output, worth $63,465.

Among its mineral resources, both developed and undeveloped, are: Asphalt, bituminous rock, brick, chromite, coal, copper, gold, gypsum, infusorial earth, limestone, marble, mineral water, onyx, petroleum, quicksilver, silver, and miscellaneous stone.

In thirty-fifth place, commercial production for 1915 was as follows:

:

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SAN MATEO.
Area: 447 square miles.
Population: 37,500 (estimate by county board of supervisors,

1913). Location: Peninsula, adjoined by San Francisco on the north. San Mateo's most important mineral products are limestone and salt, the latter being derived by evaporation from the waters of San Francisco Bay. The total value of all mineral production during 1915 equaled $177,891, as compared with the 1914 figures of $246,478.

Small amounts of barytes, chromite, infusorial earth and quicksilver have been discovered in addition to the items of economic value noted below.

In thirty-ninth place, commercial production for 1915 was as follows:

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SANTA BARBARA.
Area: 2,740 square miles.
Population: 27,738 (1910 census).
Location: Southwestern portion of state, joining San Luis Obispo

on the south. Santa Barbara County owes its position as seventh in the state in regard to its mineral product to the presence of productive oil fields

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