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The yard extends over four acres ; | dent stands on the south side of the and the rest of the section of land de- campus. voted to the institution is judiciously

The institution commenced operation left covered with groves of fine oak- in January, 1838, with six professors; trees, so that ample opportunities are and the first class was graduated in 1839. afforded for agreeable and healthful ex- It is under the direction of the presbyercise. Six acres of ground opposite terian synod of South Carolina and have been reserved for a botanical gar- Georgia, but its advantages are free to den—the gift of the city council. all. There are two sessions in the year:

The college was opened in 1839, and one from the first Monday in January has a president, three professors, with to the second Wednesday in May; after the principal of the primary depart which is a vacation of four weeks. ment, professors of music and drawing, Commencement is held on the Monday a matron, and a superintendent of do- succeeding the second Monday in Nomestic economy. The methods of in- vember. struction are thorough and practical. Oglethorpe university owes its origin The regular course includes the French to two manual labor schools, under the language; but Latin, Greek, and Span- Education society of Georgia. That ish, are taught, only in extra classes. association was dissolved, and in 1835, There is but one term in the year: from the trustees of the Medway seminary, the first Monday in October, for ten which was one of those institutions, months. Pupils are not received under offered it to the Hopewell presbytery, twelve years of age.

who received it, and soon constituted it OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY.--This in- a college, under their government and stitution is situated at Medway, in Bald- control, with a charter from the legislawin county, on account of its central | ture. That charter forbids any shop to position, in a pleasant and healthful re- be opened, within a mile and a half of gion, being a place easily accessible from the institution, on penalty of five hunall directions. The spot is elevated, on dred dollars, or more; while deeds of a ridge lying east and west, two miles university lots provide for the forfeiture and a half south of Milledgeville, and to it of lots on which such shops may ending at the bluff on Oconee river, on stand. This feature has since been inwhich are the ruins of old Fort Wilkin-troduced into other charters, and has

The foundation of the edifice is doubtless prevented many of the evils on a level with the top of the cupola of to which other literary institutions are the statehouse; and the view is exten- often liable. sive on every side, embracing an undu- The Falls Of The TOWALIGA, eight lating surface of twenty miles round, miles from Indian springs. This picincluding Milledgeville.

turesque scene is presented by the little The erection of the principal building river whose name it bears, at the spot was begun in 1836, and completed in where it pouis down a rocky ledge, 1838. It is of brick, two stories high, which there disturbs its generally gentle with a basement, in the Doric style; and course, and gives it an aspect of wildbeing painted white, and of great extent, ness, elsewhere foreign to its shores. makes a striking appearance. The chapel The Towaliga has an Indian name, of occupies the centre, forty-eight feet by uncertain import, pronounced with the sixty, with a colonnade and vestibule. accent on the last syllable. The stream The wings are each thirty feet in front, has its origin in Henry county, and purand three stories high, with professors' sues a course of seventy miles, to the and recitation rooms, while other rooms Ocmulgee, of which it is a tributary. are appropriated to the library, museum, Just before it reaches the falls (which apparatus, &c.

Two ranges of small are represented in the engraving on buildings stand at some distance on each page 123), the bed has a rapid descent side, each containing two students' for some distance, where the surface of roi ms; while the house of the presi- the water is broken in rapids, overlooked

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Falls of Towaliga.

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from the summit of a hill, over which | however, been destroyed or driven away passes the road leading to the spot. A by the hunters. mill occupies one of the banks; and a TockoA FALLS.—The most remarklofty bridge, erected across, was partly able waterfall in this state is that of the destroyed, a few years since, by a Tockoa creek, which flows from the flood.

southern extremity of the Alleganies, The falls, seen from below, make an at Cunawhee mountain. It descends impressive appearance. The breadth of one hundred and eighty-seven feet, from the bed is there about three hundred a precipice, in a narrow stream, twenty feet, and a mass of rock, at the brow of feet in breadth, which, in the rainy seathe first precipice, divides it into two son, forms an unbroken sheet of foam to sheets, which descend perpendicularly the bottom. At the ordinary height of about fifty feet, in beautiful foam, made water, the supply is so small, that it is in the course of its tumultuous passage said to be dissipated in vapor before it down the rapids. Here it is received reaches the level below. by a deep gulf

, which suddenly checks REMARKABLE INCIDENTS IN THE Hisits fury; but, before it has time to re- TORY OF GEORGIA.—As we have not cover its tranquillity, it reaches the brow room to give a connected history of this of the second rapids, down which it hur- state, it may be interesting to our readries, with roar and turbulence, a distance ers if we recount a few incidents relaof two hundred feet, and then pours ting to some of its most important over the second fall, in a current broken periods. into several cascades, when it soon sub- Yamacraw, the Indian name of the sides, below, to comparative quietness. bluff on which Savannah now stands, The height, roughness, and thick shade was the spot on which the treaty was of the banks, greatly increase the effect held with the Creek Indians by General of the scene.

The reader may form Oglethorpe, at which the first tract of some correct conception of the interest- land was ceded to him. The place was ing spot, by a glance at the accompa- then occupied by a small tribe of that nying engraving, which is copied from nation, called the Yamacraws. a print in that elegant work, “The Sce- In 1733, General Oglethorpe brought nery of Georgia," to which we have out from England a band of one hunbeen indebted for many interesting facts dred and thirteen colonists, who landed on these pages. The drawing was made at Charleston. They were there kindly from the northern bank of the stream, a assisted, and furnished with boats, &c., spot rather difficult of access, and not by which they were enabled to proceed easily attained by many spectators, who to the place of destination, and soon generally find it more convenient to con- reached the Savannah river. The foltent themselves with a view from the lowing year they were joined by five or opposite side. There are, however, six hundred more, who were provided many favorable points of view, both near with tracts of wild land, but soon proved and more distant, especially from some ill-qualified for the task they had underof the rude rocks which border and taken, and ere long difficulties arose, overhang the water, in different parts of as many of them had been collected its romantic and terrific course.

from among the poor and idle populaA short distance below the falls, a tion of European cities. The trustees little and occupies the middle of the of the colony therefore took measures river, dividing it into two currents, which to secure emigrants of a better class; are narrow, but rapid. This vicinity and, in 1735, about four hundred arrived was formerly a favorite resort of the in Georgia, from Scotland, Switzerland, deer, which visited it in considerable and Germany. numbers, to feed on a peculiar kind of Mary Musgrove was the name of an long and delicate plant, resembling moss, Indian woman, or half-breed, who renwhich grows to the length of two feet, in dered material service to General Oglethe sluices of the falls. They have, thorpe, in promoting his plans for the

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