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3. Revue des Deux Mondes, 15 Octobre, 1863. Les

Sciences de la Nature et les Sciences Historiques. Par

M. E. RENAN.

4. La Divinité de Jésus, prouvée par les Faits; Ré-

ponse à M. Renan.

Par M. L'ABBÉ PIOGER.

5. L'Évangile selon Renan. Par HENRI LASSERRE.

6. EUGÈNE POTREL.' Vie de N. S. Jésus-Christ ;

Réponse au Livre de M. Renan.

7. M. Renan et la Vie de Jésus. Par ERNEST HELLO.

8. A Chacun selon ses (Euvres !!! Observations de

Mgr. L'ÉVÊQUE D'ALGER sur le Roman intitulé Vie de

Jésus, par M. Ernest Renan.

9. Le Livre de M. E. Renan sur la Vie de Jésus.

Par M. LAURENTIE.

10. M. Renan et sa Vie de Jésus. Lettre au R. P.

Mertian, Directeur des Études Religieuses, Historiques et

Littéraires. Par le R. P. FÉLIX.

11. Une Prétendue Vie de Jésus, ou M. Ernest Re-

nan, Historien, Philosophe et Poete. Par M. L'ABBÉ

JULES-THÉODOSE LOYson.

12. Examen Critique de la Vie de Jésus de M. Renan.

Par M. L'ABBÉ FREPPEL.

13. La Critique et la Tactique. Étude sur les Pro-

cédés de l'Antichristianisme moderne, à propos de M. Re-

Par le P. DELAPORTE.

14. L'ABBÉ J. H. MichON. Leçon Préliminaire à

M. Renan, sur la Vie de Jésus.

IX. THE PRESIDENT'S Policy.

233

The President's Message. December 9, 1863.

X. CRITICAL NOTICES.

261

Parton's General Butler in New Orleans, 261. — Jacobs's Notes on the

Rebel Invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania, 264. — Heard's His-

tory of the Sioux War, 266. — Mill's Principles of Political Economy,

270. — Brace's Races of the Old World, 273. — Peabody's Christianity

the Religion of Nature, 277. — Alger's History of the Doctrine of a

Future Life, 278. — Gillett’s Life and Times of John Huss, 282. –

Kirk's History of Charles the Bold, 285. — My Farm of Edgewood,

288. — Longfellow's Tales of a Wayside Inn, 289. – Whittier's In

War Time, 290. – Stedman's Alice of Monmouth, 292. – Heine's

Book of Songs, 293. — The Two Legacies, 294. — James's Substance

and Shadow, 295. - The New Path, 303. - Dream Children, 304.

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370

7. Free Labor in South Carolina. Results of Prac-

tical Experiments. Letter from EDWARD S. PHILBRICK.

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VII. CARL RITTER

498

1. Geographical Studies by the late PROFESSOR CARL

RITTER. Translated by WILLIAM LEONHARD GAGE.

2. Einleitung zur allgemeinen vergleichenden Geogra-

phie, etc.

3. Vorlesungen an der Universität zu Berlin gehalten

von CARL RITTER. Herausgegeben von H. A. DANIEL.

4. Zur Erinnerung an Carl Ritter. Von DR. G.

KRAMER.

5. Carl Ritter, an Address to the American Geographi-

cal Society. By PROFESSOR ARNOLD GUYOT.

VIII. LOYAL WORK IN MISSOURI

519

1. Annual Report of the Western Sanitary Commis-

sion for the Years ending July, 1862, and July, 1863.

2. Circular of Mississippi Valley Sanitary Fair, to be

held in St. Louis, May 17th, 1864.

IX. WEST POINT

530

History of West Point; its Military Importance during

the American Revolution, and the Origin

and Progress of

the United States Military Academy. By Captain ED-

WARD C. BOYNTON.

X. GENERAL MCCLELLAN'S REPORT

550

Letter of the Secretary of War, transmitting Report on

the Organization of the Army of the Potomac, and of the

Campaigns in Virginia and Maryland under the Command

of Major-General George B. McClellan.

XI. CRITICAL NOTICES.

567

Shedd's History of Christian Doctrino, 567. - Craik's History of English

Literature, 576.- Smith's Dictionary of the Bible, 582. - Nichols's

Hours with the Evangelists, 585. Dawson's Federalist, 586.

Hunt's Life of Edward Livingston, 592. — Toussaint l’Ouverture, 595.

- Hoyt's Miscellaneous Writings, 602. – Clark's Daleth, 604. – Nor-

ton's Life of Archbishop Laud, 606. — Engineer and Artillery Opera-

tions of the Army of the Potomac, 608. - Chauvenet's Manual of As.

tronomy, 611.- Upham on the Rebellion, 613. — Trowbridge's Cudjo's

Cave, 614. - The Poems of Robert Lowell, 617. - Gurowski's Diary,

618. – Diplomatic Correspondence, 619. — Beecher's Autobiography,

- Thackeray's Roundabout Papers, 624. - Chaucer's Legende

of Goode Women, and Child's Observations on the Language of

Chaucer, 626. Jean Ingelow's Poems, 628. — Barnes's Poems in

the Dorset Dialect, 629.

EDITORIAL NOTE: LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT

630

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NORTH

AMERICAN REVIEW.

No. CCII.

JANUARY, 18 6 4.

ART. I. - The Life of William Hickling Prescott. By GEORGE

TICKNOR. Boston: Ticknor and Fields. 1864. 4to. pp. 491.

Books about books are to most readers comparatively dull. Criticism is a species of dissection, the graces of which are not fully appreciated but by a professional eye"; but books about men who write books address a wider circle of interest, because they add the interest of humanity to the element of literature. Books like Boswell's Life of Johnson and Lockhart's Life of Scott are universally popular, because they glow with vital warmth, and are suffused with the hues of human feeling. We trace the careers of men like Johnson and Scott as we follow the adventures of the heroes of a novel. Scott's first and unsuccessful passion is as romantic an incident as the rejection by Flora McIvor of Waverley's proffered hand. Johnson's heroic struggles against poverty, loneliness, and a melancholy temperament are as pathetic as anything in “ The Vanity of Human Wishes.” In short, a well-written literary biography is read with pleasure by all men who have any taste for reading at all.

We have in the work before us a delightful addition to the class of literary biography, for which we venture to predict a wide and enduring popularity. It is the biography of one who was not only an eminent man of letters, but also, in his private character and personal relations, one of the most frank, amiable, warm-hearted, and open-hearted of human beings. It is VOL. XCVIII. — NO. 202.

1

and was.

written by a man who from early youth was his intimate friend, and knew and understood him as well as one man can know and understand another, whom all the common friends of the two would have pointed out as the most proper person to do the work which he has done. And he has discharged the trust of friendship which was devolved upon him in a way that leaves nothing to be desired. The story of Mr. Prescott's life is told simply, affectionately, and truthfully ; nothing is extenuated, and nothing is overstated; the friends of the historian will recognize the perfect fidelity of the likeness, and the stranger who knew him not will, from internal evidence, feel assured that in these pages he has seen him as he lived

The style is correct, flowing, and easy. The stream of the narrative is rarely broken by criticism or speculation, and such liberal use is made of Mr. Prescott's journals and correspondence, that the work has something of the charm of an autobiography. It has the sweetness and the sunshine which were so characteristic of the living man, and the qualities which made hím so beloved shed their attractions over the pages which contain the story of his life. . We shall best do justice both to the historian and his biographer by giving a brief abstract of the Life, with liberal extracts.

William Hickling Prescott was born in Salem on the 4th of May, 1796. There were few happier homes than that into which the child was born, and rarely did a human being begin the voyage of life under more favorable auspices. His father had every qualification of mind, character, and disposition needed for the due discharge of the paternal office. He was a man of mild wisdom, unaffected dignity of character, sweet temper, and gentle manners. His son held him in the highest veneration, and yet with that perfect love which casteth out fear. Between the two there was always the most unclouded confidence, and so long as the father lived, the son leaned upon him as upon a strong column of support. The historian's mother was a woman of great energy, warm benevolence of heart, and that cheerful temperament which brightened every scene in which she appeared. · Mr. Prescott the elder, at the time of his son's birth, was a young but rapidly rising lawyer, so that his son never knew that burden of pov

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